True Owl

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 37 total)
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  • in reply to: Just saying hello … #15015
    True Owl
    Participant

    Hi everybody,

    It appears quite quiet in here – maybe as I progress through the course, I can fill it up a bit.

    I’ve just downloaded all the materials for the first block of the Ovate Course.
    I have not had chance to look at any of it yet – just thought I would introduce myself & say ‘Hello’.

    Hope all those doing the course are progressing well.

    I’m very much looking forward to it.

    Many blessings on your path,

    Jules (True Owl).

    in reply to: Just completed the Bardic Course and passed …. #15003
    True Owl
    Participant

    Hi Dowrgi,

    Thanks for the congrats – that’s much appreciated !

    Yes, I will be continuing next with the Ovate Course.

    “Our Ovate course is almost twice the length of the Bardic, running to about 400,000 words, with most of the 24 booklets being 52 pages long” _Greywolf.

    – – That should keep me out of mischief for a while, with it being nearly double the length of the Bardic Course.

    Re: “I hope you enjoy the Ovate grade – it’s quite a different kettle of fish !” _Dowrgi.

    – As Greywolf mentioned : “The course is challenging on many levels, spiritually, emotionally, intellectually and physically. The training wheels are off, so strap in tight, it’s quite a ride !”

    – Excellent ! From what I have read, this course covers very much my forte : Seership, Divination, Healing & Herbalism.
    I’m looking forward to it very much, and so I am ready for ‘quite a ride’ ! LOL.

    Thanks,

    Jules.
    (True Owl).

    in reply to: Just completed the Bardic Course and passed …. #14995
    True Owl
    Participant

    Hi everyone,

    I also have completed & passed the Bardic Course.

    What an experience – I thoroughly enjoyed the course and have learnt so much (and especially about myself).

    Through this course, the awen is flowing more, my creative-side has enhanced & flowing well, and I have gained the confidence to try new things out.
    My Cell of Song exercise of sensory deprivation was an amazing experience – I would never of had the inclination to try something like that without this course. For that I am truly grateful !

    Thank you to all those that have commented on my posts.

    Onwards to the Ovate course – I am looking forward to it.

    Good luck to everyone as they progress through their own courses.

    Blessings,

    Jules.
    (True Owl).

    in reply to: Ovate Course and Druid Course #14672
    True Owl
    Participant

    Hi Dowrgi,

    Re: “How you getting on with your course?” _Dowrgi

    I started these BDO courses as a refresher after completing the three Bardic/Ovate/Druid grades with the New Order of Druids (NOD) about ten years ago, but I have come across so many new and different aspects on the BDO course, that I am learning stuff anew and that is great.

    The BDO is more into the Welsh tales, rather than the Irish myths (like the NOD courses are). I have ancestors from both the Irish & Welsh sides, so its good to get a take on the Welsh side of things as well.

    The course materials are excellent. Greywolf has done a terrific job in writing them – You are made to really feel as if you are being taken on a spiritual journey with a one-to-one personal mentor.

    I am making good progress – keeping up with my daily journal writing and always making time for reading and note taking everyday of the course materials. I think that is important, to set aside time each day, so as to get in a regular rhythm – I find that works for me.

    Now the nicer weather is here, I have also been able to visit my local woods, where I sit with my favourite tree, meditate and just enjoy being in nature.

    I am gaining much & enjoying the courses, and so after I have completed this course, I will definitely be moving onto the Ovate course – Seership & healing are right up my street, so I look forward to that course in the near future.

    Thanks,

    Jules
    (True Owl).

    in reply to: Ovate Course and Druid Course #14666
    True Owl
    Participant

    Hi Dowrgi,

    Congratulations on completing the Ovate course.

    Its always good to read your input in this forum.

    Good luck with the Druid grade.

    Re: “I don’t think anyone ever really finishes these courses, and the more you learn, the more you realise that there is more to know!” _Dowrgi

    – Yes, very wise words – we never stop learning !

    Many blessings on your path,

    Jules.
    (True Owl)

    in reply to: Bardic Course 11 – Exercise 1 Your Hero Journey #14652
    True Owl
    Participant

    Hi James,

    A supplementary page has now been added for this : ‘Hero Journey Exercise’ for Booklet 11, which can be downloaded from the Package 3 section within Course Downloads.

    Blessings,
    Jules.

    in reply to: Awen & Me #14386
    True Owl
    Participant

    Hi Greywolf,
    Hope you are keeping well.
    I loved your telling of your experiences when performing ‘the Battle of Trees’ in a ceremony at the Iron Age Roundhouse a few years ago. What made me blink, was your mention of a tingling effect you experienced – This, I have also experienced myself !
    I remember doing a healing on a friend of mine, who for many years had a wart on his finger. I rubbed the wart with a leaf and said some words over it, calling on the healing spirits of nature. After a week, the wart had disappeared, but unfortunately, my friend was not very grateful, as he put it down to coincidence! No matter – What I am pointing to though, was that whilst this healing was going on, I felt a flow of tingling electric static through my body at the time, just like you mentioned. I also put it down to the strong flow of awen, and have experienced this feeling many times, particularly when being creative, ie. when writing songs on guitar.
    May the awen continue to bless you abundantly.
    Jules.
    (True Owl).

    in reply to: Happy New Year 2022 #14338
    True Owl
    Participant

    Hi everyone,

    Happy New Year.

    May this new year bring new joy, new goals, new achievements, fun, and a lot of new inspirations.

    Wishing everyone a year fully loaded with happiness.

    Blessings,

    True Owl.

    in reply to: Awen & Me #14293
    True Owl
    Participant

    Hi Dowrgi,

    Re: 14283 : “An hen yeth a vyn bewa! Yndella re bo!
    Akordys ov vy …
    Kres ha bennathow war agas hyns, ynwedh”. _Dowrgi.

    I don’t know Cornish at all, but I found a reasonable Cornish translator online.

    I think what you wrote above is this, or similar in meaning …

    “The old language lives on ! So be it !

    I agree …

    Peace & blessings likewise on your path.”

    Is that about right ?

    (You will have me speaking Cornish yet ! LOL).

    Thanks,

    Jules.

    in reply to: Awen & Me #14292
    True Owl
    Participant

    Hi Dowrgi,

    Cool – thanks for the link – I knew you wouldn’t let me down.
    Glad that someone has it listed.

    Thanks,

    Jules.

    in reply to: Winter Solstice Blessings #14285
    True Owl
    Participant

    ‘The pine stays green in winter… Wisdom in hardship !’

    Many blessings to all.

    True Owl.

    in reply to: Awen & Me #14284
    True Owl
    Participant

    Hi,

    Re: “The word nwyfre still exists in Welsh, modern Welsh, and it still means ‘sky’…” _Dowrgi

    – Just for a little exercise, I looked up ‘nwyfre’ on the web in a variety of Welsh to English translator websites, and unfortunately I could not find its meaning as ‘sky’; and one Welsh University translator (Trinity St David, University of Wales) didn’t recognise the word ‘nwyfre’ at all !

    But I did find the following meanings from a variety of 10 other Welsh to English online translators :

    godly (x7)
    Unhood ? (x2)
    nature, free (x1)

    So, maybe the word ‘nwyfre’ has changed its meaning somewhat (from the Middle Welsh to Modern Welsh) – you could say that ‘Life force’ certainly acquaints with ‘godly’ & ‘nature’.

    Blessings,

    Jules.

    in reply to: Awen & Me #14282
    True Owl
    Participant

    Hi Dowrgi,

    Re: “O bydded i’r hen iaith barhau!” _Dowrgi

    – Dwin cytuno !

    Llawer o fendithion ar eich llwybr,

    Jules.

    in reply to: Awen & Me #14277
    True Owl
    Participant

    Hi Dowrgi,

    Re: “I prefer to use the Cornish, Breton, and Welsh words in their original senses, and in the way they are still used and understood by speakers of those languages today.” _Dowrgi.

    That is great that you can do that. Unfortunately not everybody speaks Cornish, Breton or Welsh, infact a very low percentage of people do.
    So, a lot of praise to you for doing this & keeping this as your own personal philosophy. But, unfortunately, only a small group of others will esteem to your high standards and do the same.

    The thing also with Celtic languages, are that there was so many different kinds. The Celts covered much of Europe and beyond, and many tribes had their own lingo, and many of these got added to & changed over time. You have just mentioned three different languages here in the UK alone : Cornish, Breton & Welsh – no doubt there were others as well.

    Words over time change in meaning. Look at some of the words that have changed just in the last 50 years or so : ie. gay, footprint, & in computer speak we have cloud, sandbox, tweet, viral, plus many others, that have totally different meanings to what they originally had.

    I’m not saying I agree with this, but only that it happens, and there is not a lot that can be done about it – Words change their meaning over time. Its the way of the modern world and the progression of language. Even the Welsh language has changed, there being Old Welsh (from 800AD), Middle Welsh from the 12th to 15th Century & then Modern Welsh that is used today.

    But, I do hate to think that original languages die out completely, and Welsh nearly was one of these; that is why I am learning the Welsh language myself, very slowly and with great difficulty, but I will get there. My ancestors were Welsh and I am sure they would be proud to know that I am attempting to carry on their spoken language (albeit in its modern form).

    Thanks,

    Jules.

    in reply to: Awen & Me #14273
    True Owl
    Participant

    Hi Dowrgi,

    Great input, thanks – This is turning into a really interest conversation.

    Re: Iolo & Nwyfre – I totally agree with you on your stance of being wary of anything Iolo. But as you say, he did do a lot for druid revivalism, etc.

    I also don’t know why he used the word ‘Nwyfre’ either & changed its meaning, when there are other words which are closer to the mark (as you say, such as ‘nerth’ plus other Welsh words).

    The only thing I would say, is that rightly or wrongly, Nwyfre has now come to mean Life force, prana, or chi, mainly through the courses over the years from OBOD, and the term has caught on globally. As mentioned, I just see the word as a label. But, at least when someone speaks of it, we can understand where they are coming from.

    Re: “Celtic deities and mythological figures often have numerous names, so often we could actually be dealing with the same figure under a different name or guise.” _Dowrgi.

    Yes, I agree and even between the Irish & Welsh mythologies, some have been expressed as the same person. (ie. Lugh Lamfhota was the hero and formidable warrior in Irish Myth, and he is also known as Lleu in Welsh mythology).

    Blessings,
    Jules.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 37 total)