david poole

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  • in reply to: Walking Staff Making #11844
    david poole
    Participant

    I like that, Echinacea is something which I use myself and it does seem to help, although I watch my diet and try to take plenty of vitamins all the time. I have to ask you, what are the chocolate balls used for, it doesn’t seem like an obvious item?

    in reply to: faery druidry #11832
    david poole
    Participant

    I have heard of something called the Faery Tradition, someone mentioned this to me the other day. I have never heard of it before. I am guessing that this is a form of paganism centred on the belief in faeries. I know that some people are very attracted to this path but know little about it. Would you say that the Mabinogion has inspired a particular kind of Druidry Startree?

    david poole
    Participant

    Thank you William that is well spoken.

    in reply to: The BDO Safe Spaces Policy #11769
    david poole
    Participant

    People differ in their opinions and in their circumstances. Some people may be very happy to be known to be connected to a Druid grove, others may face serious problems or persecution or misunderstanding. Perhaps it is better to keep matters private unless everyone agrees otherwise; this means that those who are vulnerable remain safe. The first policy statement makes perfect sense in those terms. The second statement does make sense because once you have become public and open you must be prepared to accept the consequences, even if those consequences are negative you cannot go backwards and become private again once everyone knows who you are. This is important because everyone connected to your grove will be affected, for good or for bad. Some of your grove members may not be able to handle negative exposure, so everyone must be protected.

    in reply to: Exploring what Ronald Hutton thinks about druidry? #11742
    david poole
    Participant

    @dave I just looked for Isaac Bonewit’s book it was at least £64.25 for the paperback and around £325.00 for the hardback, outrageously expensive on Amazon. Bobcat’s books are quite good I admit.

    in reply to: Standing Stones Etiquette #11699
    david poole
    Participant

    Thank you William, I think that we shall see about that in time. Drinking or taking anything else will affect your writing, I have found that in the past with alcohol, my writing goes out of control I am much better without it.

    in reply to: A Tale to be Told #11696
    david poole
    Participant

    Gary and Ruth Colcombe have produced dramatisations of the Mabinogion and the Irish Book of Invasions, and are planning to do some other mythologies as well. Damh the Bard has dramatised three of the Branches and has just completed work on the third branch. I quite like Sioned Davis but Taliesin is not in it.

    in reply to: Lá Lúnasa shona daoibh! Happy Lughnasadh to all! #11695
    david poole
    Participant

    Thank you Dave, that is very insightful. Sometimes it helps to have simple daily advice for our lives which we can apply to create positivity.

    in reply to: Standing Stones Etiquette #11694
    david poole
    Participant

    If you smoke or drink it may not be appropriate to do this actually within the circle itself, nor in practice is it usually a good idea to enter ritual space while intoxicated as this will affect the energy that you introduce to any circle, obviously there may be ritual mead or alcohol in small quantities as an offering and maybe some smudging, but these are limited and carefully controlled and respectful.

    in reply to: Lá Lúnasa shona daoibh! Happy Lughnasadh to all! #11670
    david poole
    Participant

    Thank you Dowrgi happy Lughnasadh.

    in reply to: Exploring what Ronald Hutton thinks about druidry? #11638
    david poole
    Participant

    You are developing some very good reading habits William. The Druids and Witches, Druids and King Arthur are also worth considering. These books are interesting in that we get to see more of an attempt to tie historical Druids in with modern practices in a chain of development, although they can’t be exactly the same. By Tim do you mean Tim Sebastian? The different threads do start to come together once you do the further reading. Ronald is doing a very difficult job with considerable grace. In one of his essays, he describes how much trouble he had trying to write about paganism and witchcraft, how much disdain there was within academic and other circles and how the subject was looked down upon. By continuing to write and talk about these subjects he is performing a valuable service which cannot be underestimated. Rebel Druids in The Druids covers a bit more of contemporary Druidry, if rebel is the appropriate term it seems somewhat overdramatic. Druids Witches and King Arthur goes into contemporary Druidry in a later chapter, painting a picture of several of the figures who you mention.

    in reply to: How many druids were there? #11630
    david poole
    Participant

    If we are true to what we believe in then yes.

    in reply to: Druidry as a religion v. Druidry as a Fellowship #11629
    david poole
    Participant

    That seems like a fair conclusion Jenniferreid. I don’t think that most Druids are leaders, unless you mean leading by example or trying to relate to a different way of seeing the world which is more Nature based. That could mean priest if you are acting as a priest on behalf of Nature herself. That then implies that Druidry is more of a way of life if you are trying to lead by example.

    in reply to: THE ADVENTURE OF CRAIC RAT THE SMELLY DRUID #11610
    david poole
    Participant

    Well said William, I think you have expressed something very important here. I think that maybe there is a lot of truth in what you have said. Thank you William.

    in reply to: THE ADVENTURE OF CRAIC RAT THE SMELLY DRUID #11600
    david poole
    Participant

    I find your writing highly amusing as a fiction William, and quite well written if you do not take it seriously, as I imagine it is not meant to be taken seriously. I could argue that it is a bad portrait of Druids and that that aspect could be slightly different. I am thinking of some other fictions which paint Druids in a similar light. Britannia is very much like the story which you are telling in some ways, with Druids portrayed as dark and dangerous and a bit different, and yes uncivilised. Terry Pratchett is another author who comes to mind. The tone of your work really makes me think of Pratchett I can’t tell why. Pratchett’s Druids were more civilised but did go in for human sacrifice, but I think that was meant to be a sendup of films like The Wicker Man, which everyone has heard of.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 226 total)

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