Dowrgi

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  • in reply to: Bard Groups / Forums #13972
    Dowrgi
    Participant

    I’m afraid I can’t help with this one. Have you tried just doing a web search for druid/bardic groups in the area?

    Bennathow
    /|\

    in reply to: Rune Stones #13971
    Dowrgi
    Participant

    You’re very welcome, Mark.

    Just to satisfy my curiosity, which futhark are the runes that you have?

    Bennathow
    /|\

    in reply to: Rune Stones #13969
    Dowrgi
    Participant

    Hi Mark,

    Runes are more of a Germanic/Norse tradition, not really a Celtic or druidic one. Which futhark have you been given? The elder, younger of Anglo-Saxon? There are variations in number, symbols and interpretation. Most “standard” rune sets tend to be the elder futhark, it’s more difficult to find material on the younger futhark – the futhark that would have been used by Scandinavians during the Viking Age. If they’re Anglo-Saxon, they’ll be slightly different again. There are volumes and volumes of materials that have been published on runelore, as usual, some good, some bad and some indifferent. I’d recommend looking up the ancient rune poems as a place to start – depending on which set of runes you actually have. So, to cut a long story short, look up which set you have and then find the rune poems that correspond to them and take it from there.

    Hope that helps.

    Bennathow
    /|\

    in reply to: Autumnal Equinox Greetings and Blessings #13955
    Dowrgi
    Participant

    Thanks Dannorix – seems like the two otters are on this thread! 😀 Anyway, same to you and now only about five weeks until Hallowe’en – Samhain! My favourite festival(s) of the year!

    Bennathow
    /|\

    in reply to: I stand corrected #13946
    Dowrgi
    Participant

    Hello again Angela,

    That’s all right, there’s no harm in having a discussion about things and trying to be objective in terms of the topic. If someone does not believe in any of this, well, I suppose it’s a waste of time in effect actually trying to discuss it. For the argument’s sake, acknowledging that there is indeed something beyond our ken, then I’d say that a lot of what I see online and on television is not good. People wandering around supposedly haunted sites with recorders and electronic devices “provoking” the spirits, so to speak, or, worse still, attempting some form of séance or spirit contact, yet not actually following any of the established protocols for doing it, which those who do believe in this also believe to be just a tad risky.

    From a druidic point of view, I’d say leave the spirits alone and they’ll leave you alone. When you go to a place, you can usually pick up on the atmosphere anyway, make peace with the spirits of the place and if you feel unwelcome, move on. In any case, what right do we the living have to disturb those beyond the veil merely to satiate are own hunger for knowledge, perhaps a little rooted in our own existential doubts and fears?

    Bennathow
    /|\

    in reply to: I stand corrected #13939
    Dowrgi
    Participant

    Hi there Angela,

    It puzzles me why a believing Christian would doubt the existence of the spirit world, ghosts and so on, when this is explicitly mentioned throughout the Bible – Matthew, Mark and Luke are full of unequivocal references to Christ’s casting out of demons – notably Matthew 8:28-34 and Mark 5:1-20. The Old Testament also describes how Saul and the witch of Endor summon up the prophet Samuel. In addition to which, the numerous warnings and prohibitions against certain activities throughout the books of the Bible indicate that the people who wrote these texts, or were inspired to write these texts, obviously believed such spiritual or ghostly phenomena were real.

    Bennathow
    /|\

    Dowrgi
    Participant

    As someone who does believe that there are indeed other entities and forces in the universe, I certainly wouldn’t play around with it. I’ve had some strange experiences myself, nothing horrible, just a bit eerie or odd, yet enough to convince me that there is indeed something else beyond the material world that we normally perceive. Nevertheless, I can’t help but wince and cringe at some of the stuff I see on TV and online; in the best case scenario, completely ineffective and just nonsense, in the worst case scenario, very risky. Of course, if you don’t believe in this stuff, fair enough, but surely people who profess to believe in it, would behave differently. Anyway, just my tuppence worth on that subject …

    Bennathow
    /|\

    in reply to: Unable to post in student forums #13918
    Dowrgi
    Participant

    Hi there,

    I’ve been having a bit of trouble lately, too. I suggest you send a message to tech support. It doesn’t always happen, but sometimes it just rejects posts completely.

    Bennathow
    /|\

    Dowrgi
    Participant

    Hello and welcome Scratchy,

    I hope that you find your time here enjoyable and rewarding.

    Bennathow
    /|\

    Dowrgi
    Participant

    It is known as the “Pythagoras school”. It stands in the grounds of St.Johns college, Cambridge, on land that was owned by Oxford University before the founding of Cambridge University. I have heavily researched it and forms part of my theory that far from their being no physical evidence of pre-Roman driuds, there is actually a ton of evidence of druids that has been covered up by academia by calling it something else!

    That’s Merton Hall, isn’t it? It’s been called Pythagoras House and the School of Pythagoras since about the 17th century, although I’m not sure what the connection is with the ancient Greek mathematician and philosopher as I believe the oldest parts of the building date back to the year 1200 and a private house. I’d be interested to know where Pythagoras comes into it. It’s certainly interesting, the oldest non-religious building in Cambridge.

    Bennathow
    /|\

    Dowrgi
    Participant

    Welcome Archemedion,

    I hope you find your time here rewarding.

    Bennathow
    /|\

    in reply to: Bookshelf #13879
    Dowrgi
    Participant

    Trioedd Ynys Prydein – The Triads of the Islands of Britain, Rachel Bromwich (ed.). 4th edition (2014), University of Wales Press.

    This is what I would describe as an 834-page goldmine of information, or monster of a tome! There have been four editions of the work, going back to the first edition in 1961. Rachel Bromwich (1915-2010) taught Celtic languages and literature at Cambridge University and was a highly-esteemed academic in the field of Celtic studies and, especially Welsh literature.

    I would say that this book is essential for anyone interested in following a bardic path and or interested in medieval Welsh and, by extension, Brythonic, culture, folklore and literature. It would be impossible to summarise the book here, however, the strong points for me are the original Welsh verses with convenient translations but, above all, the exhaustive notes and the four useful appendices with guides to personal names, place names and the lore surrounding them. As I said before, it really is a goldmine of information and succeeds in shedding light and adding levels of understanding to the Welsh materials – especially to those whose knowledge of the Welsh language may be limited. For example, in the notes to personal names section, (p.284) there is a fascinating discussion of Ar(y)anrot that offers a number of insights and avenues to explore in relation to Arianrhod, including linkes to Gaulish, Breton lore and other literary sources and materials. If you want to go in depth, then this is certainly a brilliant reference guide.

    I wouldn’t exactly call it light reading, however, that obviously was not the way the work was intended! Perhaps on the pricier side, as more academic works unfortunately tend to be, I would regard this book as an investment in knowledge and a reference work to be used and enjoyed for a lifetime.

    in reply to: Carn Marth – Ancient Fertility Goddess? #13871
    Dowrgi
    Participant

    Morning,

    I’ve no doubt that option 3 plays a part in this either. I’m sure there’s been a lot syncretism or fusion over the years. Interestingly, some holy wells in Cornwall were also associated with divination. According to folklore, Gulval Well was looked after by an elderly lady and young women would go to the well and consult it as some kind of oracle to find out about their futures. I think there are some similar traditions with holy wells in Ireland. I’ve read that Madron well also had some association with divination, too. At other wells, coins or bent pins were left to the piskies.

    Bennathow
    /|\

    in reply to: The New BDO Bardic Course #13865
    Dowrgi
    Participant

    Hi Angela, it’s a pity you don’t have the time to commit to further study, but do stick around here for a chat! 🙂

    Bennathow
    /|\

    in reply to: The New BDO Bardic Course #13866
    Dowrgi
    Participant

    PS. I agree with your points on safeguarding mental health and wellbeing, too.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 499 total)

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