You have to be able to deal with the put downs to be a bard

The British Druid Order Forums Student Support Forums Bardic Student Support Forum You have to be able to deal with the put downs to be a bard

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  • #10173
    Anonymous

    You have to be able to handle and deal with the put downs when you pick up the chair of the bard. You
    have to understand that there are going to be people who criticize and dis your bard work. This is normal
    and do not let the people who tell you that you suck win. Part of the creative process is learning from
    your mistakes. In fact the 70s band The Grateful Dead would not have ever been if it was not for being
    able to make mistakes at the Acid Tests. So cheer up, learn from your mistakes, and don’t give up on your
    songwriting and storytelling and poetry. Don’t be stopped from following your dreams from people who are
    trying to make you feel bad about your creative works. Write with Awen Star Tree

    #10174
    Dowrgi
    Participant

    “Three things that make awen for a bard:
    genius, and practice, and art.”

    Gramadegau’r penceirddiaid. Translation: Gwilym Morus-Baird.

    Talent alone is not enough, hard work and skill are also needed.

    In life you’ll always come across detractors; it’s important to learn how to distinguish between valuable criticism, i.e. constructive critique, and negativity. Part of the hard work is, perhaps, accepting the criticism too.

    You might find this site interesting.

    The Triads of Poetic Craft

    #10379
    david poole
    Participant

    I simply don’t understand why anyone would attack Bardic performers, it is a beautiful form and completely valid as an artistic form of expression, Bards don’t harm anyone and can be very inspirational. Don’t anyone ever let anyone put you off following your Bardic practices.

    #10450
    Anonymous

    Hail David Poole, I agree with you all the way. and as Wiston Churchill said, “One must never forget when misfortunes come that it is quite possible they are saving one from something much worse; or that when you make some great mistake, it may very easily serve you better than the best-advised decision. Life is a whole, and luck is a whole, and no part of them can be separated from the rest.”
    ― Winston S. Churchill, Churchill: The Power of Words and, “Success is not final, failure is not fatal”
    ― Winston Churchill, Churchill: The Power of Words and Let it never be said that you crept into the crypt, crapped, and crept out again.”
    ― Winston S. Churchill, Churchill: The Power of Words

    #10474
    david poole
    Participant

    That is a remarkably philosophical stance to take Startree, I hope that there is some truth in what you have said. Perhaps this is true after all.

    #10512
    Anonymous

    Dear Druid David, some of the stuff I have found out is to never trust one source of authority. When making big decisions, check out at least 3 or 4 sources of authority. Often people who claim that they know something or have the answer, just don’t, or give you the wrong advice, and that can lead to real sorrow. The otherworld is definetly around us, but the trick is, can you get in touch with it, can you stay open enough to listen to it, and what it is trying to say. So, stay open to change and listen to signs, like crows calling outside your widow, or strangers telling you weird things, because it could be a message from the otherside, the otherworld.
    It often seems to me like the whole world is full of salesmen, and every one is in competition with each other. And there is no reason to think that our higher selves, our spiritual side, does not already know many of the secrets to magic, if we just take the time to be still and listen. But more what is the point of magic. It seems to me it is all about becoming more aware of a higher consciousness, a real change of the human spirit that brings us closer to love and happiness and a peaceful way of being. Further, I think there is definitely an astral plane or astral energy, and this is what so many of the witches talk about. They talk about forming thought forms on the astral plane so that these things will become real on this plane, where ever that is. There is the saying as above so below. I know that I have been on the astral planes many times, but I still don’t know how to just get there anytime I want. Maybe it has to do with certain places and times of the stars.
    We all want to get in touch with our higher will, and make our dreams come true, and find friendship and love, things that we all need. And magic can do this if it is used responsibly. Plus living a magical life is so much fun, and better than the mundane world of competition and working at jobs just to make money, jobs that you never wanted anyway. It is like each of us come into this world with some path to fulfill and anything that takes us off that purpose or journey is bound to fail. Now this becomes hard on people who are writers or artist, because the society really does not value writers and artist and musicians. However, if you are a bard, then I think it is best to give it your all, and not try to be an accountant because of all the money they make. I think a lot of people are very unhappy because they chased the money and not the work that they love. Also, I am just starting to learn how to visualize, and it seems that it is important to be calm and relax when you visualize, and also to practice at it everyday, like learning to play violin. Magic is just going to take time to learn, and I think it will be some hard work, and will take persistence. But the doors to the magic kingdom should open at some time, and time is not always linear. But one more thought, if you do follow the path you love, it is said that the universe will help you, and all kinds of magical doors will open for you, and all kinds of magical and talented and beautiful people will come into your life, and I am starting to think this is true. Best Star Tree

    #10537
    david poole
    Participant

    Thank you for your advice StarTree, these are wise words.

    #11056
    Anonymous

    Many druids do not believe in reincarnation, and this is why many druids do not understand many of things I say. I experience time as spiral, and the human soul as eternal. So, there has never been a beginning or end to the spiraling in or out. But if you see time as linear then time is measured in mile stones, very different way of looking at life. Also, I see many events going on at the same time, and events in the future are effecting events in the past. There are also many different dimensions and selves, and these are jumped from time to time to time. the akashic records are also not recognized by many druids, and it is there that soul and spirit can be healed and changed, lost parts of souls running and being reconnected. It, is more than this world is alive, there are many worlds going on at the same time. A thin veil, a faery passage. a highway to the stars running through out time, a train that can be caught and traveled into the distant past or future. A crystal ball. But, without an understanding of the eternal soul, spirit, all this goes right past the window, not noticed, but out of a corner of the eye, to be quickly dismissed as a darting mouse. Here, in the eternal, is where the Celtic warrior has his courage, for he never knows death, just change. Here is where the druids merge with the trees and wind and stars.

    #11253
    Jen Bottom
    Participant

    I run a couple of small folk music sessions.
    I really don’t like it when people who are “good” at what they do musically, come in and trash someone who is maybe giving their first public performance, or for what ever reason, isn’t considered as “good” as the other person.
    Even if you think something really sucks, it’s only going to go on fir a few minutes of your life, so you can put up with it, or get a drink, go for a walk etc.

    I try to be as friendly and encouraging as possible, because I myself don’t have a ton of musical talent, but I still enjoy what I do.

    I think enjoying being creative is the best part. After all, if you don’t enjoy it on some level, why do it?

    Also I’m learning to play the fiddle, so I expect I will post some fairly “bad” recordings here, as I progress.

    I do believe everyone can be a bard if they wish, but not everyone has the courage or opportunity to perform in public necessarily.

    That’s ok by me.

    Blessings,
    Jen.

    #11276
    Anonymous

    Dear Jen Bottom,
    As a writer, and musician, and sometimes fiddle player, I really find that people who are not creative just do not understand creative people. I also have found that I am fragile about my art and writing and try not to just share it with people while I am in the process of creating because I can get some pretty weird and negative feedback from people. And the feedback can be enough to kill a book or a song. I really feel artist are very sensitive people. And I really feel that society does not understand us. They just don’t look at what we do as real work, when we as artist know that music, and writing, and art is real work.
    I think what you are doing with the open mic time is great and that you have the right attitude about it because different people are at different levels. I always try to encourage people to be creative and have a go at it, and I feel just like you do about not putting creative people down, or discouraging people who are just starting out. One of the things that helped me a lot with the fiddle was setting up a rig where I could see a rack mount tuner, and see if I was hitting the right notes on the fiddle because the fiddle has no frets it takes a while. I found once I got to hitting the right note dead on, that the tune really comes alive. I love the fiddle tune the gold ring, saddle the pony, and the ten penny bit. The first two songs were written by the shining ones, the good folk, the faeries themselves. Also, as you go along, you might want to explore some phantom powered mics, like the DPAQ clip on, which has 48 volt phantom power, and sounds good on a fiddle. But there is a lot of new stuff coming out. Phantom power will require a power supply for it. I also really like the earthworks SR40V mic. There really is nothing else like it for voice. If you are going to mic a guitar, I would stay with the LR Baggs. Enough gear talk. I have found that there is a lot of competition in the creative fields of art and music and writing. And that is why some teachers can be so mean when they teach it, the teachers are trying to prepare their students for a dog eat dog world. Another thing I find is that when I get feeling low, I try to go back to people who inspire me like the poetry of Paul Maldoon, or Seamus Heany, or other artists who I feel are magical. I am a bard for the Tuatha De Danann tribe of faeries so I try to do my best and learn as much as I can, because being a Tuatha De Danann Druid is a blessing in itself and allows me to see the Celtic Otherworld, and even the moon looks different and more magical. I hope all members of the BDO will always encourage creativity in the other members. And I think it is just Grand that you are running the sessions. Further, I find that if you just stick at it, like fiddle playing, and play some each day, even when you don’t feel like it, you start to get really good. Fir,I feel the trick is just to practice some each day, or write some each day. Jen, may you be blessed with the awen and music of the Tuatha De Danann, your are truly a mighty druid. best BlueFalcon

    #11278
    david poole
    Participant

    It takes a certain amount of confidence to be able to perform in public and I certainly respect that. As BlueFalcon says, and I agree, it is better to finish a creative work before sharing it in order to avoid unnecessary criticism. I am a very sensitive person myself and can encounter all kinds of reactions.

    #11279
    Jen Bottom
    Participant

    I agree that it is certainly good to be fairly confident you have “finished” a creative work before you perform it. Some people however may never feel that they have finished something though, so they may never perform it.
    I certainly felt like that when I recorded something for OBOD as part of my studies.
    It came out ok, but I could have recorded it 50 more times probably and still been finding things that could be better.
    Sometimes, some people do just have to get out there and do it at some point, though they may not feel the work is done.

    I think we all agree that it’s not great to be a jerk to someone who’s sharing their creations with others, but not everyone in the universe necessarily thinks that way.

    Also personally, I get very nervous when I’m playing the fiddle, so I do make mistakes, or don’t play the tunes as well as I can perhaps do when practicing alone.

    In summery I agree that if you want to go public with your barding, at some point someone will not give you the most constructive feedback, and you will need to be able to find ways to process that so you can continue creating and sharing it with a wider audience.

    Best,
    Jen.

    #11287
    Alexander Valdes
    Participant

    I know this may sound very reductive, but I suggest wearing bright colors or silly shoes if anyone is having difficulty in dealing with the gaze of others.

    Revel in weirdness and demand to be seen. Wear that hat, or that shirt you like that you don’t think fits right. Voice your opinion and laugh loudly at jokes. If the world refuses to understand, make them love your strangeness.

    Also, as a practicing member in America, the conversation with appropriation often has opening to extoll the virtues of the Bardic path.

    #11294
    Dowrgi
    Participant

    I know this may sound very reductive, but I suggest wearing bright colors or silly shoes if anyone is having difficulty in dealing with the gaze of others.

    Revel in weirdness and demand to be seen. Wear that hat, or that shirt you like that you don’t think fits right. Voice your opinion and laugh loudly at jokes. If the world refuses to understand, make them love your strangeness.

    I think anyone who is going to perform in public has to accept that you’re always going to get hecklers. I have a good friend who is a magician and street performer and to listen to some of his stories … you always get “that person” who thinks it’s funny to heckle or spoil the tricks – “It’s up his sleeve!” 😀

    Also, as a practicing member in America, the conversation with appropriation often has opening to extoll the virtues of the Bardic path.

    Could you explain more?

    #11297
    Alexander Valdes
    Participant

    I agree! I have no anger towards them, but there’s certainly a type of person that thinks spoiling the fun is what everyone likes. The same people that point out the scary bits in haunted houses!

    As for my other comment, being an American in his 20’s (and living very near DC) I’m exposed pretty heavily to modern ‘woke’ thinking. Naturally, this includes discussing appropriation. I think it was booklet two that said portions of that appropriation come from a craving for spirituality in one’s life. I believe that to be true, and on several occasions now have pointed people from our shared heritage (my mother came to the US in her 20s, my family mainly lives in Wingate near Durham) towards the study of druidry. Them being usually too well minded to call themselves Apache Shamans still meant they had that missing spiritual aspect in their life. As I show them this path, many express relief at a spiritual cultural heritage they can participate in without being a part of neo colonialism. Often it starts with them asking about our altar or wanting to come on a hike (which then exposes them to our weirdness!!).

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