Who’s afraid of the big bad witch?

The British Druid Order Forums BDO Public Forum Who’s afraid of the big bad witch?

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  • #9933
    Anonymous

    Who’s afraid of the big bad witch?

    “Hello piglets, who’s afraid of the big bad witch,” said the scary old druid who had no teeth and warts on his face and yellow skin with spots. “I am,” said the little druid girl, “because I am afraid that she will put a curse on me and my old mum. We even have pieces of mirrors in our windows at home to deflect the big bad witch’s evil spells. “I am, also,” said the young boy who was stirring the cauldron full of chicken soup, “because when I walk by her house, I can feel all the hate that she is sending me, and her face looks like a fishing accident.” “I am also,” said the big bad witch’s neighbor, “because she threw an evil spell at me yesterday, and I had to stop it with a banishing pentagram.”
    As Druids, we have all met the Big Bad Witch. The Big Bad Witch is usually the type of person who is new to the craft, and has learned just enough about witchcraft to cast an evil spell on someone.
    The Big bad Witch goes around threating everyone that they better not mess with the Big Bad Witch because the Big Bad Witch is the big bad witch and will curse anyone who goes against the big bad witch or who disagrees with the big bad witch. The Big Bad Witch loves hate, and feeds of the energy of hate. The Big bad witch must have someone hating the Big bad witch at all times so that the big bad witch can feel alive.
    What the Big Bad Witch does not understand yet is the law of karma, or what goes around comes around, or also known as the law of the returning tide. You get the idea. Casting an evil spell on someone is like pouring gasoline on yourself and setting yourself on fire. Don’t do it, ever, never, for no reason. And if you feel the Big Bad Witch’s hatred, just ignore it, and get away from the Big Bad Witch. Again, The Big Bad Witch feeds off hatred and you hating the big bad witch and sending her/ him negative energy is just what her/him wants you to do because it makes the big Witch feel like the Big Bad Witch is alive, and makes the big bad witch feel like a powerful person.
    Evil is like the magic ring in the lord of the rings, everytime you use it, it takes over your soul a little more, until it has devoured you. And sooner or later, every garden variety druid and witch learns how to place a curse. As a druid bard, I think curses are wrong, but I do think there are times to place a binding spell on some evil people, so as to prevent further harm from their evil, like when Ross Nichols and Gardener, placed a binding spell on Hitler so as to keep him out of the U.K. during world war two.
    Now, I know of several things you can do in response to dealing with evil people. The first thing is to ignore them and stay away from them and do not respond in any way to their hatred. Second, you can use a banishing pentagram in a jam to stop an evil spell coming your way, but it is just a temporary fix, and if the Big Bad Witch wants to get you bad enough, a pentagram won’t hold for long. Third, I have heard of people like the Farr’s using mirrors to reflect back the evil spell on the sender, but I don’t know anything about that, so you could give it a try. Now, what do you do if the Big Bad Witch gets really nasty and evil.? I say, at that time it is time to call in the Archangels for protection. The Archangels are non-denominational and are the big guns when evil gets evil. I was once playing my conga drums and I was playing the bamboula. The bamboula is a voodoo drum call. Anyway, to make it short, Papa Legba showed up, and I told him “my bad” didn’t not mean to call you, just beating on the bongos like a chimpanzee. And he left, and I called in the Archangels just for peace of mind. But there are times that I am in the middle of the night and some evil presence shows up to frighten me and my skin gets goose bumps. And If I feel that the thing is evil, I call in the Archangels. So, it works for me. I have also found that the sage works good for getting rid of evil in the house. Could go on with lots more stories, but I think you understand what I am talking about. May add some more stuff later. All I can say is that evil is real, and there is no Hollywood Movie that does it justice. So stay in the light, be positive, be kind and loving, don’t send hatred out to people, and all will be well. Plus, some good advice and old druid once told me is “If it don’t concern you, don’t mess with it.”
    Best Star-tree

    #9934
    Dowrgi
    Participant

    I’ve never actually met anyone like that.

    As for karma, I think it’s more to do with what people will have in their next lives, if you subscribe to those schools of thought and belief. What I have come across is the “Law of Rebound”.

    Anyway, anyone going around saying they’re putting curses on people shouldn’t be taken seriously in my opinion. The power of a curse is only as much as you believe it yourself, so there’s no need for anything other than your own confidence and good energy.

    Bennathow.
    /|\

    #9935
    david poole
    Participant

    I have witnessed acts which suggest people like this exist; it is a real shame. No-one should hate other people so much that they resort to curses. That is really sad. But you can’t completely account for human nature. In general it might be better to ignore it, or to make a simple blessing to counter the evil effects.

    #9938
    Anonymous

    All history is written by the people who are the conquers, so all history is written to make the conquers look good and the conquered look bad. So History can never be trusted, only myth can be trusted. Taliesin was a bard, and it did not take him 20 years to become one. I believe that the whole idea of a twenty-year druid school is a hoax. Most of the real druids had faery blood in them, so they could naturally turn into trees or raise cones of power. Merlyn and Taliesin were both druids who had faery bloodline. I think modern druids should be careful about believing everything that the Romans and the Christians wrote about us because they do not have the first clue about the druids, or how many of us there are. The druids were never wiped off the face of the earth like the history books claim. Myth should always take precedence over history. There are many reincarnated druids among us, and druids have high standards of ethics. Trying to look at the past druids through the lens of roman and Christian writers is to see darkly and not see the truth. Further, a curse is nothing more than a spell that is used for evil instead of good. And druids do know spellcraft. But, druids also know the cost of using a spell for evil, so no modern druid would ever use a cursing spell. Druids walk with the other world, we have other world friends, and the druid way is a spiritual way of life that honors our relations with animals and the earth and the trees and the faeries and the gods and goddesses. I believe that if you are a druid, you will know it, and no amount of training will matter or change the fact of what you are. The druid way of life will call to you if you are a druid, and you will have to answer it if you ever want to be happy. So accept it, if you hear the call. It is only in acceptance that peace can be found.

    #9940
    david poole
    Participant

    Your words are very true, I feel that most people do not understand what we are about. But there are many areas of common interest and people of different faiths can work together to improve the lot of the human race. It is true that the historical records are propaganda exercises designed to write off Celtic people. Perhaps this is something worth going into further, it might be worthwhile countering some of the mistruths in order to present a more positive picture. Archaeologists and historians can be rather scathing as well. Ronald Hutton might be the only academic who can tell a compelling and understanding narrative towards paganism and Druidry as it is today; he is somewhat aligned with OBOD, so he does carry that perspective and his work can be academically rather than spiritually orientated, but he is a good spokesperson generally.

    #9941
    Dowrgi
    Participant

    Taliesin was a bard, and it did not take him 20 years to become one.

    I’m not sure; according to myth, he was already a young boy as Gwion Bach ap Gwreang when he was serving Ceridwen, then the fateful day occurred and he went through a series of transformations with the enraged Ceridwen in pursuit until he washes up on the shore and is found by Elffin ap Gwyddno as a newborn baby (again). At the age of 13, he is taken to the court of Maelgwn ap Cadwallon, King of Gwynedd where he prophesies the downfall of the king. So that would, albeit mythologically speaking, give us somewhere of around twenty or more years and a couple of reincarnations/transformations. I think that in Gaelic tradition we find that the progression from a bronze-branch bard, or Ollair, to an Ollamh was about ten years, and a golden-branch bard probably about 12 years – let’s not forget that the bardic tradition remained alive in Gaelic Ireland and Scotland as well as in Wales into relatively recent historical times.

    I believe that the whole idea of a twenty-year druid school is a hoax

    Again, I wouldn’t be so sure. There would be no reason for Caesar to have made this up, and the Romans had had dealings with the Celts/Gauls for hundreds or years, most of northern Italy was Gaulish/Celtic at one stage and the great Roman writer Cicero, Caesar’s friend, also claims to have known a druid by the name of Diviciacus/Divitiacus and of whom he writes in friendly terms; Diviciacus was actually allied with the Romans against his own brother. Reading through what the Greek and Roman authors wrote about the druids, within the greater context of their views on non-Greeks and non-Romans, you’ll find some writers more sympathetic than others – it’s a mixed bag.

    The fact that druidic training may have taken so long, given their reluctance to commit anything to writing, doesn’t really surprise me. It’s interesting to note that an oak tree takes up to twenty years to grow from an acorn until reaching maturity and a lunar metatonic cycle is 19 years. Perhaps there is/was a connection? In many traditions around the world, training and initiation require long periods of devotion and study and I believe that in dharmic paths in India, the sadhus train for many, many years too. In Christian tradition, Christ started his ministry when he was in his thirties. So, given the traditions around the world and the writings we have from the ancient world, I see no reason for this claim to be a hoax. What would it have served Caesar to make something like this up? Furthermore, the Romans he was writing for were well acquainted with the Gauls, and it would not have been in Caesar’s interests to be too blasé with the facts otherwise he would have lost credibility. The great Roman writer Virgil was himself from Cisalpine Gaul, near modern day Mantua, which had only been a fully-fledged Roman province fewer than ten years before his birth in 70 BCE.

    The period of transition to Christianity in the Celtic countries seems to be marked more by transition and syncretism than by bloody conquest or conversion, at least for the most part, and as was mentioned elsewhere, some of the so-called Celtic saints have something very druidic about them. Saint Columba himself is said to have maintained the bardic traditions in Gaelic Ireland and Scotland and the bards or filí were the keepers of much druidic lore. Saint Brigid’s mother was supposedly a Pictish slave who had been sold by her father Dubthach to a druid. The later traditions surrounding Saint Brigid, with maidens tending an eternal flame under a sacred oak at a place that had been dedicated to the Irish goddess … Brigid, all tantalisingly point to some syncretism and continuation going on here. Although the later hagiographers no doubt edited and exaggerated and added more vitriol, a lot of the earlier material and the survivals point to a lot of transition too, so I wouldn’t write everything off either, especially not from people who were dealing with druids in their own historical lifetimes. Was it for nothing that Saint Columba is said to have written: “Christ is my druid?”.

    Another important thing that I believe we should bear in mind is that the societies we are talking about were not homogeneous and static, comparing a late Bronze Age/early Iron Age druid to an early medieval Irish or Welsh “druid” or bard would be like comparing a medieval priest to a modern-day pastor, it’s anachronistic at best.

    #9944
    Dowrgi
    Participant

    Archaeologists and historians can be rather scathing as well. Ronald Hutton might be the only academic who can tell a compelling and understanding narrative towards paganism and Druidry as it is today; he is somewhat aligned with OBOD, so he does carry that perspective and his work can be academically rather than spiritually orientated, but he is a good spokesperson generally.

    It might sound strange, but its good that archaeologists and historians are “scathing”, within reason and in a sense, because they’re doing their jobs properly. A scientist of any sort has to look at things with a critical eye and apply logic and Occam’s razor based on the evidence that they have; that’s fair enough. Having said that, if I want to seek inspiration in the land, I don’t necessarily need to know which pottery-culture and period the menhir or kistvaen in question belongs to if you see what I mean. Nonetheless, the druids of old were esteemed as natural scientists, botanists and astronomersof their time, so I think it’s also important to seek out knowledge and accurate information and let’s be honest, there’s a lot of very poorly written and spurious nonsense written about druidism out there too. I too have felt very let down at times on learning that something that I had previously held important turned out to be made up, conjecture or, to put it bluntly, just rubbish.

    With regard to Ronald Hutton, I’ve read some of his works and I find him quite readable and informative, although I did read that he came in for a lot of flack from some quarters after he published the Triumph of the Moon. Personally, I think Professor Hutton is doing exactly what a historian should do, that is to question and scrutinise claims against historical evidence, if that doesn’t suit people because it doesn’t fit in with their own narrative, so be it, but you can’t blame a historian for being a historian, can you? Moreover, I find Professor Hutton’s approach refreshingly open minded.

    #10012
    Anonymous

    these are great replies, and please, never take anything I say as dogma, or too seriously. I feel that being a druid does mean you are a wee bit playful, and not like someone who has been put in a blender, and then poured into a little druid mold, and then put into some oven and baked until done, so that you can live your life as a druid groupie of some pagan leader who has lots of fans. Being a druid is not a cult of personality where you believe every bit of dogma that some famous pagan says. But sadly, there are always people out there who are lost, and hurt, and are looking for a savior. Of course, it is important to study history so that we can shine a light on the present, even if it is only a candle light. I really like what Graywolf was talking about in the first bard lessons because I like the idea that we are druids living in a modern age with all this great technology, and we should be happy about our lives where they are now, and we don’t have to be all sad that we are not back in the 5th, century. Also, Graywolf is a really good druid who teaches for the right reasons. So the BDO is a good place to be and a fun place to be, and is not all full of gloomy druids. Druids know that the world is a wondrous and marvelous place, even though there are bad things in the world. We walk through life with the inspiration of awen and the inspiration of nature lifting up our hearts. We live in the continuum of the spiral of life, accepting the truth of life, the paradox of the flowing stream and the charted ocean, being flexible, and also determined and focused. Plus, I like dressing up in the white robes, and gold torcs, and crowns of holly and mistletoe, celebrating the change of the seasons, and honoring and being grateful for the gifts of the great Mother Earth.

    Many, Many, Blessings, Star-tree

    #10107
    Anonymous

    How can we understand what a druid is unless we use their language, which welsh is very close to, like the world experience, which is Profiad, or brofiad in welsh. Druids would profiad or brofiad life. I like brofiad better. You have to brofiad life. Unerstanding is all about the language, and there is no way to understand a culture without using their language because their words hold different meaning, and ways of understanding things. I think I will brofiad that tree, and be the tree, be the brofiad. And profedig the tree, dude. Welsh is the closest language to old gaelic. Taliesin would have been written is something like welsh, and we get the word awen from welsh. Early English in the Canterbury tales is much prettier than modern English. When we lose language we lose culture, and much more, we lose understanding of spirituality. And what better way to wipe out the scotish and irish than to try to wipe out their language like the british did. Even today there are Scottish people who are against learning gaelic. The words are the reality. Inspiration is not the same thing as awen. The welsh at least are holding onto their language. And if welsh was lost we would lose much more than language, we would lose magic and reality. So, I will profedig life.

    #10113
    Dowrgi
    Participant

    There are arguments for and against. Protecting and reinvigorating Celtic languages, as all endangered languages, could be seen as cultural or linguistic ecology because when you lose a language you lose a lot more than just grammatical rules and dictionary definitions, and it is certainly something that I think we would all support. At the same time, the Welsh, Cornish and Breton spoken today would probably have been unintelligible to an Iron-Age druid and vice versa, just as Modern and Old English or Norwegian, Danish and Swedish and Old Norse would also be mutually unintelligible, Icelandic and Faroese perhaps the exceptions. I don’t think we should go down this “ethno-centric” route at all, in fact I think it’s a very unwise route to go down.

    Moreover, all around the world people follow numerous religions, faiths and philosophies without necessarily using or knowing the “original” languages their scriptures were written in and still manage to have fulfilling and rewarding outlooks on life and experience and I feel that this is more what we should be about. At the end of the day, what language does an oak tree speak? You can revere the oak in any language you wish.

    My own outlook is as follows: should someone who is following a bardic course and exploring druidry take an interest in the Celtic language? Yes. Must they have an obligatory advanced level in those languages? No.

    Just as an aside, the closest language to Old Gaelic is Irish, not Welsh. Don’t forget that the Welsh, Cornish and Bretons would also they were Britons, i.e. British too.

    Bennathow.
    /|\

    #10245
    Anonymous

    Dowrgi, I am talking about the language that Taliesin wrote in, he wrote in an old form of welsh. I don’t know about irish, Plus the Cornish had their own language deal. and The welsh were not Brits, you are dreaming
    on that one. The welsh were separate from the Britts.Why don’t you go on over to Wales and tell them that the Welsh are Britts. I think you will get a strong disagreement on that one and probably have to run for it. Further the Bretons are a whole other deal. . Look you wipe out a language and you wipe out a culture. That lot down in London tried to do it to the Scottish. And the white people in America did it to the blacks. Language is the most powerful force on earth. Again, as a bard you should understand this. Moreover, people all over the world of numerous faiths are following a faith that has been rammed
    down their throats by the English army at the end of bayonet and a firing squad. At the end of the day , Dowrgi, and oak tree can speak English if it has grown up around English speaking people. I have talked to many oak trees in English. But it is not up to the oak trees to
    speak English, it is up for us to speak their language, their consciousness,. And no, you can’t just talk to an oak tree in any language you want. And again, the Scotts and Welsh are not Britts. Try telling a glassweign that he is a Britt.,

    #10249
    Dowrgi
    Participant

    Dowrgi, I am talking about the language that Taliesin wrote in, he wrote in an old form of welsh. I don’t know about irish, Plus the Cornish had their own language deal. and The welsh were not Brits, you are dreaming on that one.

    The Taliesin of the 6th century CE probably composed in Cumbric. The Common Brittonic (P-Celtic) languages of Britain only started to diverge into Old Welsh, Cornish, Breton and Cumbric at that time. We don’t know enough about Pictish to be sure, but recent scholarship suggests it may also have been a Brittonic language. Allowing for dialect differences, these early forms of the respective languages are likely to have been mutually intelligible, perhaps to such an extent that their speakers wouldn’t have noticed much more than accent. Moreover, Cornish and Breton were difficult to distinguish from each other until the Middle Ages, and still retained a mutual intelligibility, according to historical accounts, until the mid-18th century. This high level of similarity has actually made it difficult in the past for historians working with manuscripts to determine exactly which language they’re dealing with. As a person with some knowledge of the Cornish language and who has also travelled in Brittany, I can attest to the similarities at a basic level – especially with place names, likewise in Wales, albeit to a lesser extent.

    The word Britain, via Latin Britannia, is supposed to derive from Celtic *Pritani, giving rise to the word British – Brythonaidd/Prydeinig in Welsh, Brythonek/Predennek in Cornish and Predenek in Breton – the similarities are already there to be seen. In the Welsh literature of the Middle Ages, we find the word Brythoniaid (Britons) referring to the Welsh, gradually being superseded by the word Cymry (Companions/Compatriots) – also remembered in the word Cumbria. Despite not being unified in one kingdom as such, this sense of being Britons, ergo not Saxons, is alluded to in Armes Prydein Vawr (Taliesin Book VI) and elsewhere in the early literature. Moving on, the Bretons call themselves Bretons, i.e. Britons, and live in Brittany because they trace their cultural origins to Britain, Brittany being “Little Britain” – in fact Great Britain is known as Great Britain to distinguish it from Brittany. Therefore, looking at the ancient literature and the linguistics, it would suggest that a common sense of being Britons, of being peoples coming from the same cultural background and origin is common to all three Celtic nations.

    Now, if we consider the words that others used, it seems to back this up: Welsh comes from Anglo-Saxon and originally meant “foreigner”, Cornwall (Kernow) was also called West Wales and the Cornish were referred to (by the Anglo-Saxons/English) as the “West Welsh” or “Cornish Welsh” – something which continued up until relatively recent historical times, the name “Corn-wall” in English being “Cornish Wales”, to which you might add that there is also Cornouaille in Brittany (Kernev). These strands of culture, language and identity twist around each other like a Celtic knot.

    In conclusion, I’d argue that there are no historical, linguistic or cultural bases to say that the Welsh, Cornish and Bretons are not Britons within the context of Celtic studies. We don’t really use the word “Brit” in the UK that much anyway, so I think you need to be careful with your nomenclature and not confuse British in a cultural and geographical sense with the English/UK establishment of the past. While it is probably fair to say that most people in the UK are still fond of their heritage, be it Welsh, English, Cornish, Highland Scots, or even more recent arrivals to these shores, the word British actually unites all of us as pertaining to this island, our passports say British at the end of the day. We also understand how we are all related to each other anyway.

    Try telling a glassweign that he is a Britt.,

    I’ve been to Glasgow and I know plenty of Scots people who don’t mind being called “British”, if you say English, that might be another matter.:-D
    Nationalism is toxic, it poisons everything, I’d steer well clear.

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