The path of Druidry

The British Druid Order Forums BDO Public Forum The path of Druidry

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  • #12590
    Anonymous

    Maybe the best way to see druidry is as if you are on a path through the enchanted forest, but it is a path, and it is not just walking through the wildwoods and stepping on the ferns and mushrooms, and it not a direction North. Some people think of it as a way, but to me that sounds like a lifestyle, and it is not a lifestyle. It is a path, a well-trodden path. And like any path through the forest, from time to time you meet another traveler on the path and talk awhile about where the path splits in two and takes you to the river, or find a shelter, or you find a bear coming your way. The travelers on the druid path can be trippy or wise, trickster or helpers, and they may share their food with you, and you may make some friends. A path is not a religion, and all paths have cutoffs and cutbacks. There are also mountain bikers on the path, and there are old and young. Children also are on this path, and with their walking sticks, they look like adventurous hobbits, full of wonder at the world of trees and moss and rocks. Sometimes you get tired on the path but have to keep going anyway. Paths often go in circles and lead you back to the parking lot where you started from, where you might see a falcon or a baby bird, and take a rest room break. After you walk the path you always feel better and the exercise is good for you. And you know that you are being watched by the faery folk who live in the woods and the deer and rabbits as you walk the path.

    #12596
    Anonymous

    The Gomm in the Enchanted Forest

    Once upon a time, a young druid set off on the path through the enchanted forest to go and visit the circle of standing stones. He had saved his money from working as a baker for a very long time in order to pay for food and lodging and a gift for his mum, and he had managed to save 11 gold coins, which is a great deal of money even now in these times. The young druid put the gold coins in a brown leather bag that he had tied onto his belt and set off down the path in the enchanted forest. He was so happy looking at all the magical old oak trees and watching the red hat faeries running about on official faery business that he must of taken a wrong turn somewhere, for it was not long before he did not know where he was. So, as you can imagine, he was very happy when he saw a gomm perched on a large gray stone that was covered in magical druid carving and conspicuous green moss. Now gomms are known to be magical creatures, and this gomm had curly hair and was about the size of an elf. The young druid said to the gomm, said he, “Hello, I am a druid who is new to the enchanted forest, and I have lost my way to the druid standing stone circle. Can you tell me how to get there?” The gomm smiled and said, “No, but I can sell you a bard map that will show you the way for just 3 gold coins.” Now the young druid thought that 3 gold coins was a great fortune to spend on a map to get to the standing stone circle, but he was lost, and really did not know what else to do, so he reached into the brown bag that was tied to his belt and fished out 3 gold coins and handed them over to the gomm. The young druid unrolled the map that the gomm had sold him, and said, “this map just shows me the way to Beaver Lake, but does not show me the entire way to get to the standing stone circle. The gomm with a face of assurance said, said he, “Oh, you will need the ovate map for that.” To which the young druid said, “where do I get that.” The gomm smiled, and said, “I can sell you the ovate map for 3 gold coins.” Having already spent 3 gold coins for the first map, the young druid decided to pay the gomm 3 more gold coins for the ovate map. Then the young druid unrolled the ovate map and said, said he, “this map gets me to Black Spider Overlook, but still does not show me the entire way to the standing stone circle.” To which the gomm said,“ You need the druid map for that.” Now, the young druid had already paid 6 gold coins, and he decided the only thing to do was to hand over another 3 gold coins to the gomm. The gomm got his gold coins, and the young druid finally got the last map he would need to guide him to the standing stone circle. So, the young druid started to walk away from the gomm, but as he was walking, the gomm spoke up, “Hold on, do you know about the black spiders that eat druids? I wouldn’t want you to become a spider dinner.” The young druid stopped in his tracks and walked back to the gomm. And while standing in front of the gomm, he listened to the gomm tell him why the young druid should buy the gomm’s book on how to avoid being eaten by the black spiders. Now, the druid only had two gold coins left, but gold coins are worth a great deal, so even one gold coin would be enough to cover the druid’s expenses on his trip to the standing stone circle, but he would no longer be able to buy a gift for his mum. The young druid paid the gomm a gold coin for the gomm’s book titled, ‘How to Avoid Being Eaten Alive by Black Spiders in the Enchanted Forest,’ written by a Mr. gomm, and then the young druid turned to be on his way. But after 3 steps, the gomm spoke up again. “Wait, I can sell you book on how to get a dragon to fly you to the standing stone circle, and that information will save you three days’ walk, and you won’t have to worry about black spiders or orks or very mean witches. The young druid really did not want to be eaten by black spiders or worried by orks or meet up with any really mean witches, so he agreed to the bargain, and he gave the gomm the last piece of gold from the brown bag. Then the young druid took off down the path, and when he looked back at the gomm, the gomm he was smiling, for the gomm had spotted another young foolish druid walking towards the gomm’s perch on the gray stone that was covered with druid symbols and conspicuous green moss.

    #12633
    Anonymous

    The Wolf at the Lore

    The young druid, Startree, had fallen asleep between the roots of a large ancient oak tree in the enchanted wildwood and was awoken in the morning by the sound of “Woof.” It was not the kind of “Woof,” that would scare a person, but a very friendly warm “Woof.” When Startree opened his eyes, he was staring face to face into the blue eyes of the grey wolf. The wolf spoke in a very nice way, and his voice was full of integrity. The wolf said, said he, “I am the guardian of the lore of the wildwood, and last night my spirit flew with the owls through the mist of the wildwood, and I saw you sleeping here, so this morning I thought it would be nice if I visited with you for a chat and brought you some breakfast.” Startree, felt very safe in the wolf’s company, and told the wolf all about how he had lost all his money to a trickster, and how the books and maps he bought did not help him, and how now he was lost in the wildwood. The wolf offered Startree a cup of herbal tea and some blackberry’s, and then said, “ Don’t worry, I can give you directions to the standing stone circle for free, and the stories you read in the books of Celtic lore are not what you have to do as a druid, but the stories are there for you to think about, and question how you would respond if you were a character in the stories. Would you have made the same decisions that the Celtic gods and heroes made, or would you have done something different? Here in the wildwood, the earth goddess loves all of the plants and animals and travelers on the path to the circle of standing stones.” Now as you can imagine, the druid Startree felt much better hearing this, and the hospitality and paw of friendship of the wolf had really cheered Startree up. And after tea and some very lovely bilberry biscuits, the druid Startree was once again on the path to the standing stone circle.

    #12634
    tony1kenobi
    Participant

    I look forward to enjoying the journey to the standing stone circle

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