St. Patrick’s Day

The British Druid Order Forums BDO Public Forum St. Patrick’s Day

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  • #14623
    Dave TheDruid-3X3
    Participant

    Awens to All:

    This week’s Thursday was St. Patrick’s Day and I did my Traditional St.Patrick’s Day Feast.

    I get a big can of Puritan Irish Stew, Steam some Carrots & Potatoes and mix it with the Irish Stew. I then get in 2 Cans of Guinness Stout Beer and have my Irish Stew Feast while Guinness Beer while watching my Favorite St.Patrick’s Day Movie:

    In The Name Of The Father!

    #14624
    Dave TheDruid-3X3
    Participant

    Here is one of the Most Epic Scenes in the Movie:

    Can not find Two Other Scenes that I really Loved a lot do not appear on YouTube.

    The Welcome to the Scottish Prison Scene and that Scene when the Corrupt Irish Cop gets finally realizes that he has been working with Corrupt Assholes and announces, “I’m going back to Belfast!”.

    I Love the Corrupt Irish Cop Scene because if there were someone like Him, the Last Place he should go would be Belfast.

    Before going back to Belfast, he would have to get Plastic Surgery and change his Name and Hope Like Hell that Nobody Recognizes Him.

    3X3

    #14630
    Dowrgi
    Participant

    I’m glad you enjoyed your St Patrick’s Day celebration, along with countless millions around the world – in Ireland itself, and beyond.

    Nevertheless, this raises questions from a druid’s perspective. Did Saint Patrick really exist? Or, did the Saint Patrick we “know” really exist? If those Mediaeval accounts are to be taken at face value, it doesn’t seem like he was any friend of druidism.

    Tochuiriur etrum indíu inna hule neurtasa,
    fri cech neurt namnus nétrocar …
    … ban ocus goband ocus druád.

    I have set around me all these powers,
    Against every hostile savage power …
    … the spells of smiths and druids,

    Saint Patrick’s Breastplate, attributed to the saint himself.

    Beannachtaí
    /|\

    #14661
    Dave the Druid
    Participant

    This looks like fun. (second bloody attempt)

    I’ve always thought of St Patrick as a murderer (of Druids). The history we have points to Patrick “dismissing” the Druids. Now stop and think. This is at a time in history when Christianity was going great guns and getting converts by hook and dagger. Now the high king has been converted and so have his subjects. The bards (thank the gods for spell check. That started out, barfs) seem to have been subjects of a king or royal or warlord. The Druids were not and considered a threat for the old religions hold on the countryside. We don’t hear much about Druids after Patrick. Yes little children, there were probably murders.

    Peace and Harmony,
    Dave the Druid

    #14663
    Dowrgi
    Participant

    The trouble with Saint Patrick is separating the probable, historical man, a Romano-British Christian, from all the later embellishments and hagiographies. However, Saint Patrick – the mythological figure – is certainly not someone who seems to have liked druids, and I think the (mythological) feeling was mutual. There are, however, other Celtic saints, whose relationship with what seems to be indigenous British and Irish beliefs are far more nuanced, less antagonistic, or, let’s say from an early Christian perspective, ambiguous. I remember being told that some of the many now obscure saints to be found in Cornwall and Brittany may have even been druids … perhaps. In my opinion, Saint Petroc is one of the more interesting ones – Saint Petroc who tames dragons, note the word tames, not slays.

    Bennathow
    /|\

    #14668
    Dave the Druid
    Participant

    Dowrgi,
    Greetings.
    Let’s play that again.
    I recall that some Druids in other parts of the Celtic world were made saints. Some of those names appear at churches in the area they came from.
    But, but; we were talking about St. Patrick and the Irish problem or more precisely St Patrick’s Catholic problem with the Druids.
    The past is murky especially when the written word is so scarce and derivative. What do we really know? Patrick was an escaped slave that converted to Christianity and traveled to Ireland to spread the gospel to the heathen therein. He seems to have been successful in his mission. You really have to admire his zeal, his methods less so.

    Peace and Harmony
    Dave the Druid

    #14671
    Dowrgi
    Participant

    Patrick was an escaped slave that converted to Christianity and traveled to Ireland to spread the gospel to the heathen therein.

    Patrick was a Romano-Briton. His place of birth is not clear, some suggest Cumbria while others indicate Northamptonshire. Whatever the case, his father Calpurnius was a decurion and a deacon – he himself the son of a Romano-British priest Potitus. As a young teenager, Patrick was captured by Irish slave-raiders and taken to Ireland, where, as the story goes, he regained his faith, so to speak. He escaped back to Britain and then decided to go back to Ireland to spread the word. I don’t think Patrick converted to Christianity, he was a baptised Christian, he just became filled with piety and spirit because of his admittedly traumatic experience.

    Nevertheless, the whole story, dare I say mythology, of Saint Patrick is so fraught with problems from a historiographical point of view, that a very large pinch of salt should be taken with any of it, for example, the business of the snakes. A lot of what is purported to be “known” about Saint Patrick’s life and deeds comes from later hagiographers who, naturally, had their own agenda when writing all of this down. Another difficulty arises in that Patrick was by no means the first missionary to the Irish, Palladius, a Romano-Gaul, was actually the first bishop to the Irish, preceding Patrick, not to mention the so-called “pre-Patrician” saints of Ireland. In fact, it may be the case that the whole hagiography of Patrick is a pseudo-biographical/hagiographical blend of the lives and deeds of a number of saints in Ireland – especially Palladius.

    Bennathow
    /|\

    #14673
    Dave the Druid
    Participant

    That tracks with what I remember. I studied it as part of my degree work some 40 years ago.
    When I was learning about Druidry I focused on the Welsh and west lands. I had already been to Stonehenge (once) and Avebury (three times). I barely touched the Irish matter. Angelsy, as the center for Druid training made it reasonable to focus my studies there. I don’t recall any Druid training centre in Ireland. If there was any I missed, I am sorry.
    In short, it’s one day a year when I can be a curmudgeon to cherry people.

    Peace and Harmony
    Dave the Druid

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