Rune Stones

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 17 total)
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  • #13966
    Mark Scales
    Participant

    Hi, I am looking for a bit of advice. I have been very fortunate to be handed down a lovely set of handmade rune stones and was looking to see if anyone could give me some practicable guidance on how to use them please.
    Thanks
    Mark

    #13969
    Dowrgi
    Participant

    Hi Mark,

    Runes are more of a Germanic/Norse tradition, not really a Celtic or druidic one. Which futhark have you been given? The elder, younger of Anglo-Saxon? There are variations in number, symbols and interpretation. Most “standard” rune sets tend to be the elder futhark, it’s more difficult to find material on the younger futhark – the futhark that would have been used by Scandinavians during the Viking Age. If they’re Anglo-Saxon, they’ll be slightly different again. There are volumes and volumes of materials that have been published on runelore, as usual, some good, some bad and some indifferent. I’d recommend looking up the ancient rune poems as a place to start – depending on which set of runes you actually have. So, to cut a long story short, look up which set you have and then find the rune poems that correspond to them and take it from there.

    Hope that helps.

    Bennathow
    /|\

    #13970
    Mark Scales
    Participant

    Thank you this is really helpful and has give me a good start to look into this more thoroughly.

    With thanks
    Mark

    #13971
    Dowrgi
    Participant

    You’re very welcome, Mark.

    Just to satisfy my curiosity, which futhark are the runes that you have?

    Bennathow
    /|\

    #13979
    Dave TheDruid-3X3
    Participant

    Awens to Mark:

    I Won a set of Jade Runes at a 2007 Pagans Pride Day and after doing a lot of Research into the Runes, compiled a Grimoire Tomb of the Meanings of the Runes and have done Runes Castings based on my Research.

    I usually have always done Single Casting Pulls for Specific Questions put forth by the Kyakusama but also do the Classic Past, Present and Future Divination that is used for Tarot as well.

    I could start doing a Rune Per Day Posting based on my Research if your guys what.

    3X3

    #13980
    Dave TheDruid-3X3
    Participant

    The Thorn Rune:

    Thorn Rune

    Rune of Activity,and of Active Exchange. It Awakens the Will to Act. It Symbolizes Thor’s Hammer. Rune of Opposing Polarities: Life and Death, Hot and Cold, Light and Darkness and of joining Opposites. Rune of Eternal Return. It is the Rune of the Dowsing Rod. Rune of Magnetic Transfer. Rune of Mental Telepathy. It helps to get in touch with the Continuous Changes of Life. Protection against Attacks. It Strengthens ones Aura.

    Thorn, or þorn (Þ, þ), is a letter in the Anglo-Saxon and Icelandic alphabets. It was also used in medieval Scandinavia, but was later replaced with the digraph “th”.

    The modern Digraph th began to grow in popularity during the 14th century; at the same time, the shape of thorn grew less distinctive, with the letter losing its ascender (becoming similar in appearance to the old wynn, which had fallen out of use by 1300) and, in some hands, such as that of the scribe of the unique mid-15th century manuscript of The Boke of Margery Kempe, ultimately becoming indistinguishable from the letter Y.

    3X3

    #13981
    Dave TheDruid-3X3
    Participant

    Just checked one of my Old Websites for Runes Information and it appears to have a lot of Great Updates & Changes.

    Please check it out:
    https://www.runemagick.com

    3X3

    #13983
    david poole
    Participant

    You could try Runic Inscriptions from Wooden Books, I happened to pick this up one day by chance, the Wooden Books series is always good and worth looking at

    #13988
    Mark Scales
    Participant

    To 3X3 thank you so much for the info, really appreciate it.

    Also to David Poole thank you, will certainly try and get a copy of Runic Inscriptions.

    To Bennathow, I am a complete novice on runes having stuck to a faithful tarot deck for a number of years so if it helps I can take a couple of photos and send them across?

    Thank you to everyone again. We certainly have a great supportive group on the forums.
    Mark

    #13991
    Dowrgi
    Participant

    Morning Mark,

    Simpler than that would just be to count them. Excluding an extra blank rune, if there is one, an elder futhark set should have 24 runes, the younger futhark 16 runes and the Anglo-Saxon (also known as Anglo-Frisian) futhark should have 30 runes, or more if additional symbols have been included. There is a bit of variation with the symbols, especially the younger futhark and later Scandinavian developments through the Viking Age and into the Medieval period – in some areas of Sweden, runic writing even survived until the early 20th century. In Iceland there was also a development of runic script and the Galdrabók, dating from the late 15th to early 17th centuries, contains a mixture of Medieval to Renaissance lore, Christian “folk magic” and runic material. The blank rune is a modern invention if I’m not mistaken.

    A book I’d recommend would be Long Branches: Runes of the Younger Futhark, by Ann Groa Sheffield. Although the book deals principally with the younger futhark, it does go into the background, mythology and lore behind the symbols into a lot of detail and references the elder futhark, too. In my opinion, you can’t really undertake serious rune work without a good grounding in the Germanic/Norse mythologies and cultures. Also be aware that most of the esoteric material about runes dates from the early 20th century onwards. How they may have been used by ancient Germanic seers is still open to conjecture, that’s why I’d recommend looking at the early Anglo-Saxon and Scandinavian rune poems as a good place to start.

    Bennathow (which is Cornish for – blessings 😀 )
    /|\

    #13998
    Mark Scales
    Participant

    Thank you to everyone who took the time to reply and I have purchased myself a copy of Long Branches by Ann Groa Sheffield from the Book Depository.

    #14000
    Dowrgi
    Participant

    Don’t mention it, just glad to help. I hope you find the book useful.

    Bennathhow
    /|\

    #14001
    Dave TheDruid-3X3
    Participant

    In my Runes Set, the Sowelo Rune is referred to as ‘Sig’ Rune.

    3X3

    #14007
    Dowrgi
    Participant

    Hi Dave,

    The name *sowilo is a modern reconstruction in proto-Germanic based on the Norse and Anglo-Saxons names of the rune, which were variations of Norse sól and Anglo-Saxon sigel, that is to say, the sun. The name sig, I believe, was invented in the early 20th century. Unfortunately, a lot of Germanic/Norse material in the early 20th century was appropriated and adulterated by German nationalists and used in the propaganda of the Nazis and extreme nationalism and volkisch ideologues.

    Bennathow
    /|\

    #14038
    Dowrgi
    Participant

    Morning Mark,

    I just thought that you may also want to research the Rúnatal and the 18 charms of the Ljóðatal – both sections of the Old Norse Hávamál – a bit more cryptic in many senses than the rune poems, but they give you an insight into the cultural beliefs of the Scandinavians of the period with regard to the runes.

    Bennathow
    /|\

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