never too late to see.

The British Druid Order Forums BDO Public Forum never too late to see.

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  • #10124
    Ragnarsson
    Participant

    I wonder how many Druids went through the same revelation as myself. Now a so called pensioner, I travelled the world from the age of 16 and in doing so , saw and encountered many things this world has to give. my later life was one of the normal pattern of most peoples lives and that was getting married ,having children etc,. The one constant link through it all was my love of trees, Forests, mountains , oceans and solitude whilst being there. As most people in the UK I was raised being told my religion was church of England and I really never questioned it although it never really meant anything to me. It was only after reading a pagan letter and looking into it a bit further, that everything fell into place and I realized that all my life I had actually been a Druid. Added to this the fact I have always had flashbacks to other times , where the images have been very intense and that my visions of things to come so often do happen. I am so glad that even at my age all this was eventually understood, I can honestly look too my spiritual future with much more clarity and understanding. Ragnarsson

    #10126
    Anonymous

    Hello Ragnarsson, And welcome home. Yes you have always been a druid. and you live in the most wonderful place to be a druid, the UK. You will find the power spots like Glastonbury tor will enhance your mind and help you in remembering. There are also many stone circles. and spell craft in a power spot is always ten time stronger, and meditation there is more uplifting because the otherworld is closer there, and it is easier to go through the hedge there. For me, my Celtic mind can live with paradox, and I am both a christian and a druid. I think that druids are kind and loving people. And I love the Celtic stories and live in them. I also did not realize that I was druid until late in life. It was only when I accepted my Celtic heritage and culture that I started to heal and feel better about life. I encourage you to play original Celtic music. Harps are easy to play, and the Pilgrim harp company makes the ashdown harp. Also, the good folks, the faeries are all around the UK, and all the druid trees are in the UK. This is the time that the druid consciousness is returning to the world. Many people are starting to remember that they were and are druids. I wish you big sails on your journeys to the druid sacred sites in the UK, and hope to go to many of those places in my life. Best Star-tree

    #10127
    Dowrgi
    Participant

    I wonder how many Druids went through the same revelation as myself. Now a so called pensioner, I travelled the world from the age of 16 and in doing so , saw and encountered many things this world has to give. my later life was one of the normal pattern of most peoples lives and that was getting married ,having children etc,. The one constant link through it all was my love of trees, Forests, mountains , oceans and solitude whilst being there. As most people in the UK I was raised being told my religion was church of England and I really never questioned it although it never really meant anything to me. It was only after reading a pagan letter and looking into it a bit further, that everything fell into place and I realized that all my life I had actually been a Druid. Added to this the fact I have always had flashbacks to other times , where the images have been very intense and that my visions of things to come so often do happen. I am so glad that even at my age all this was eventually understood, I can honestly look too my spiritual future with much more clarity and understanding. Ragnarsson

    Hello Russ.

    Dynnargh dhis! Welcome!

    That’s a very deep and sincere introduction. I can understand where you’re coming from. I was perhaps lucky as I was brought up with all of our “traditions” in a sense, and there was never really any conflict between them so to speak.

    As a lad, I was always happiest when wandering around the woods, paddling in streams or getting lost on Bodmin Moor! Well, that was once, but I remember actually feeling happy about being lost and not feeling lost at all – if any of that makes sense.

    Bennathow.
    /|\

    #10290
    Greywolf
    Keymaster

    Hi Ragnarsson,
    I was brought up by atheists, so had no church to get out from under, except the church of atheism, to which my parents were quite deeply attached! My Druid revelation came through reading Robert Graves’ ‘The White Goddess.’ I still love the book because it opened the path to me. I wouldn’t especially recommend it to anyone else though. It’s a very dense and difficult read and a lot of what Graves says about, for example, the poems of Taliesin, is extremely misleading. As said, though, it did set me off on the path I still find myself on 46 years later. I thank the gods that I lived to be a pensioner, not least because the state pension is largely what’s keeping food on the table for myself and the two of my offspring who still live with me! Also, as my long grey hair continues to fall out, I can feel less self-conscious about referring to myself as a Druid Elder 😉
    Many blessings,
    Greywolf /|\

    #10319
    david poole
    Participant

    I have yet to read that book although I must get around to doing so at some point. What if anything do you make out of the Golden Bough, another influential book? I was particularly struck by the chapter on tree worship in Ancient Europe. Perhaps this is something which earth based religions have in common.

    #10322
    Dowrgi
    Participant

    Hi David.

    I was given a copy of The Golden Bough as a present when I was a teenager. I remember finding it quite hard reading, it’s very Victorian in its style and can be hard going. What to make of it? Well, Frazer came in for a lot of harsh and scathing criticism from different quarters – be they religious or academic; however, sometimes I feel it is a little unfair as Frazer himself stated that his work was speculative and not meant to be some kind of ethnographic treatise. Furthermore, Frazer was a man of his times, so, inevitably you’ll come across Victorian attitudes towards different people around the world too. Having said that, I still found it a fascinating read and if it does nothing else, it gives you names, places, ideas and hypotheses to explore. Despite its flaws, I’d still say it’s worth a read.

    I’ve also read The White Goddess, another book that came in for fierce criticism, again perhaps a little unfairly in that it was criticised for not being something that Graves probably never meant it to be in the first place. Nevertheless, Graves was without doubt a great poet and his skill is such that I’d heed Greywolf’s warning, many of the ideas found in The White Goddess are so convincing that you can easily fall into the trap of being misled into thinking that they were part of some body of “authentic” lore. In fact, The White Goddess has generally been rejected by the academics involved in Celtic studies, yet has “plagued” much non-academic writing on the subject ever since. I’d approach it like you would approach Tolkien, for an understanding of Germanic/Nordic folklore and mythos you could do a lot worse than reading The Hobbit or The Lord of The Rings, yet you’d accept that they were modern works of fiction and concede that Tolkien took his own flights of fancy too.

    Bennathow.
    /|\

    #10324
    david poole
    Participant

    What do you make out of the idea of a Celtic Tree Calender Dowrgi? I know that a lot of people use this calender so was interested in finding out what you thought of the idea yourself. It appears to be a lunar calender which is quite interesting. Of course you could also have a solar calender which would work rather well with the solstices and equinoxes, maybe better than a lunar calender ever could.

    #10327
    Dowrgi
    Participant

    What do you make out of the idea of a Celtic Tree Calender Dowrgi?

    It’s a beautiful, interesting and highly intuitive idea and as long as we acknowledge that it is not really ancient or based on what we can demonstrate unequivocally as being ancient Irish ogham lore, I don’t see any harm in it. However, we do have a Celtic Calendar, the Coligny Calendar, and I personally think that is far more interesting, albeit far more challenging. Having said that, the Celtic peoples and their cultures didn’t suddenly freeze at some mystic point of time in the past and new interpretations of the old are positive and healthy – and this has always been the case anyway. My only objection is, at times, to when quite spurious stuff or blatantly “copied-pasted-from any other cultural tradition-translated-in-Welsh” materials are presented in such a manner as perhaps to convince that they are something they are not to the detriments of the more genuine folklore, traditions and culture of the Celtic peoples.

    Bennathow.
    /|\

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