Mabon, Alban Elfed–the harvest festival

The British Druid Order Forums BDO Public Forum Mabon, Alban Elfed–the harvest festival

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  • #12084
    Startree
    Participant

    Mabon is the harvest festival and is celebrated from September 21 through whenever people get tired of it. it is during the time of the fall Equinox. So, it is not so much of an equinox celebration, but there is the idea of change in it, and leaving behind the past, and learning from mistakes. This is the celebration druids should celebrate, the harvest from the country and would be a grand time to go apple picking up near Charlottesville Virginia. However it falls, Ross Nichols wanted people to get back to the country and get out into nature.

    #12086
    Startree
    Participant

    Mabon is named after Mabon

    #12087
    Startree
    Participant

    Bards get help from the Celtic Otherworld, and awen from the Celtic Otherworld. Druid priest communicate with the Celtic Otherworld gods and goddess. Ovates see into the future and learn their magic from the Celtic Otherworld. There is no witchcraft in it at all.
    makes you wonder about all the Celtic killing. Was it ordered at the command of the Celtic Otherworld. Was god on their side. and look how the Christian Church turned the Celtic Gods and goddesses into christian gods and goddesses. Lugh into the Ange Michel, and breej-eh into Bridget. I like laughing hippy Jesus with sun glasses on. Or stoned Jesus smoking a joint. Remember that guy, he was a happy guy, not like the fundamentalist punishing Jesus. Christianity owes a lot to the Celts, who invented the fun parts of the religion. It must have been nice to have clean air and water in the highlands. Today, druidry is more a mix of everything, like some strange salad. druidry is about love, love of friends and family, love of the earth and the plants and the rocks and the water.

    #12111
    Dowrgi
    Participant

    Hello there.

    I’m not that keen on Mabon as a festival name. The traditional festival around the time of the Autumnal Equinox round my neck of the woods is Guldize or Goel Dheys in Cornish. This is a harvest festival and involves, among other things, “Crying the Neck”, a ritual in which the last sheaf was scythed and this was usually made into a corn doll. The corn dolls were once kept by the hearth over the winter and then ploughed back into the land for the new year. The traditions practically died out with mechanisation and modern farming techniques, but fortunately were revived and saved for posterity in the early 20th century.

    The reason that I’m not so keen on Mabon is that the name for the festival only originated in the 1970s and the mythology of the relatively obscure figure Mabon ap Modron does not really have much to do with harvest traditions. Now, if people involved in Druidry want to celebrate Mabon, that is their choice and I hope they find it rewarding and fulfilling, however, I personally find it far more “organic”, for want of a better word, to keep up the country and local traditions of the Celtic nations because those, in my opinion, are more of a living link with our ancestors than anything else.

    Bennathow
    /|\

    #12113
    Startree
    Participant

    Dear Dowrgi, thank you for all that great information about the name of the festival in Cornwall, and I agree with you all the way. Also, thanks for the information about how the name got going in the 1970s. I really love it when you share information about what goes on in Cornwall, and it is so authentic. I see Guldize or Goel Dheys as a very very old celebration of the harvest, and I also really like the name harvest home. And it shows how close they early Cornish were to the land, and the idea of the corn dolly is just magical. This is the kind of druidry I love, the kind that has down home festivals, and is all about just being with nature. I like this festival much more than the American Thanksgiving festival, and feel Guldize really is what Ross Nichols wanted druidry to be, a kind of inspiration that gets us in touch with nature. And the word organic is a great word to describe it. I think this festival is coming up soon, and is celebrated from September 21 to the 24. Best William

    #12129
    Dowrgi
    Participant

    A late good morning to you Startree.

    I really feel that Druidism needs to be local. In ancient times, it seems that Celtic religion(s) were very localised; similar threads ran throughout, but at the same there were also many differences. I don’t think we need to create pantheons, creeds, rigorous canons of belief and a sort of Celtic-flavoured initiation of Graeco-Roman religion, which was also highly varied and by no means what we’d recognise today as “a” religion as a such.

    Given that we all inhabit different parts of our planet and our ancestors’ bones and dust are also mixed in different parts of the planet, I think the most rewarding thing is to tune into our local environment and, of course, the traditions of our own families and ancestors. The first thing I’d say to anyone exploring Celtic spirituality and Druidism is get to know and tune into the place where you live – it doesn’t matter if it’s in the wilderness or in a densely populated urban area – you need to tune into that first and foremost.

    Anyway, as I always say, that’s just my take on things. Each person must find his or her own path through the forest.

    Bennathow
    /|\

    #12208
    Ray
    Participant

    I appreciate all of these different takes on Autumn Equinox. Especially the ones from Britain. The area I live in and its local legends and celebrations (before colonization) belong to the remaining indigenous people and they have them copyright protected! Tough to be a BDO Druid on the west coast of the USA when trying to talk about authentic Genus Loci

    #12211
    Dowrgi
    Participant

    Morning Ray.

    What I mean by tuning into the local area could be as simple as “mapping” it out in your own mind, walking the land and feeling the energy and, for example, meditating in a forest and letting it speak to you. If something comes to you in that moment, then this becomes your connection with the land. I don’t think anyone needs to copy anyone else in this regard.

    Bennathow
    /|\

    #12216
    Ray
    Participant

    Thanks Dowrgi
    I have had experiences like that. There is a Cedar/Alder Grove by a Salmon Run out in the Natural Resource Department lands where I do most of my rituals and meditation. I appreciate what I learn from the cedars, the alders, Devil’s club (local version of Tinne)and the forest. Lowen Guldize
    Ray

    #12217
    Dowrgi
    Participant

    Lowen Guldize

    Gromerci, ha Goel Dheys lowen dhis ynwedh! πŸ™‚ Thank you very much and happy Guldize to you too!

    Bennathow
    /|\

    #12221
    david poole
    Participant

    That sounds like a wonderful place Ray.

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