Kabbalah Master

The British Druid Order Forums BDO Public Forum Kabbalah Master

Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #10432
    Anonymous

    I think Jesus was a Kabbalah master. Think about it. It takes about 20 years to become a Kabbalah master. So, if Jesus started young, he would have been a Kabbalah master by 30.
    There is no miracle that Jesus did that a Kabbalah master cannot do. And after Jesus, the Jews made sure that no one could start studying Kabbalah until they were at least 40 years old because the Jews did not want another repeat of Jesus. Further, the word sacrifice just means to make holy, so Jesus dying on the cross symbolizes that man is a holy being and should be
    treated with dignity. Now I think there is no doubt that Jesus was in touch and worked with the Archangels, but that is one of the things that a Kabbalah master would do anyway. I am not trying to be sacrilegious; I am just putting forth a reasonable theory. Now why would you talk about Jesus to druids you ask? Because even Ross Nichols remained a Christian all of his life, so there. And If Jesus was born with super Jesus powers, why didn’t he use them to teach before he was 30 years old. Answer, Jesus was not born with super-powers and did not get them until he became a Kabbalah Master. The Golden Dawn Tarot cards are influenced by the Kabbalah, and the cards walk you through the journey we are all on from fool to enlightenment. Or maybe just back to fool again. Aleister Crowley new about the Kabbalah and there are many Egyptian symbols and clues in the Golden Dawn design tarot deck. Still, I am a mythic, intuitive druid, and not a neodruid, who are intellectual, history druids. Today, in this industrial world, the jews let people who are under 40 years old study the Kabbalah, so, could we have many Jesus types walking around now? Or soon? Maybe the desert fathers were also Kabbalah masters. Also, how far did Crowley get into the Kabbalah? Did he fall short of becoming a master, and only learn enough to entertain European society, and manipulate rich people into backing his lifestyle and giving him money? There seems to be a great deal of human potential that we all have but are not making use of. And is the Crowley statement that, “Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the law, and Love is the law, love under will, “ a valid way to approach druidism and witchcraft. I don’t even think I understand what it means. What does love under will mean? It seems to contradict itself. Maybe Jesus was not a Kabbalah master, but the idea that he was makes a lot of sense to me. I do feel we all need love, and even cats need love, and plants need love. Love seems to be something more than just energy. And I do not think there is a man alive who can ever understand how deep a women’s heart goes. I have tried to learn the Kabbalah several times, but I get bored with it and give up. However, I don’t see why a druid would not benefit from knowing the system, if you are into it. I personally, am more into taking long walks in the enchanted forest and playing Grateful Dead songs on my guitar, and writing books. So, I just don’t have time for everything. One way or the other, I am sure Jesus was aware of the Kabbalah system of magic, and I think my idea is a valid one.

    #10444
    Dowrgi
    Participant

    Hi there.

    The trouble with Jesus being a Kabbalah master was that there is not much material historical evidence that the Kabbalah existed during Jesus’s lifetime, certainly not as we would understand it today, and historians generally point to around the 12th century CE. This is not to say that its spiritual tradition does not go back further, I don’t think anyone would doubt that. As for the young Jesus, don’t forget Luke 2:39-52 – when the boy Jesus astounds the wise and learned discussing matters with them in the Temple. Don’t forget either that there are many “other” books of the Christian New Testament which weren’t included in the “official” version, and those do speak of the boy Jesus doing miraculous things. Are they true? Are they invented? Are they hiding a deeper truth? That’s down to the individual I suppose. There is of course a strong folk tradition that a young Jesus came to the British Isles with Joseph of Arimathea – the Glastonbury Thorn tree, in which case, he would have been talking to druids, perhaps. Sadly, the Glastonbury Thorn, which was held sacred by many different spiritual groups, was vandalised in 2010 and removed once and for all in 2019.

    Bennathow.
    /|\

    #10449
    Anonymous

    Hail Dowrgi, yeah I can understand how not much history of the Kabbalah at that time could kill my pet theory. But here is a new theory, all of the new religions like Christianity are nothing but the old religions that have new characters and gods standing in for the old gods. Such as Mother Mary for the earth Goddess, or Jesus for Angus OG, or god for Dagda, or the saints like Bridget for the goddess Bridget. What do you think about that? And I do think that this Crowley has strongly influenced druidism, and I am pretty sure he was into the Kabbalah. the Kabbalah also has a lot to do with being able to visualize, and there are a lot of druids who seem to think that it is important to be able to visualize. Further, if there is an overlay of the new on the old that means somewhere, there must be a Celtic god of forgiveness and mercy. But, most druids I have met are not really into Christianity, and the thing is I am thinking that a person’s religious orientation has a lot to do with how you see the world. I know that because I am a druid, I see nature different than a lot of other people who are not druids. Are you sure that the Kabbalah was not known in the beginning of the first century? I will have to investigate this more to be sure the Kabbalah was not around then. It almost seems that the druid spirituality is a counterculture to christianity, and sort of a new age movement that is part pop psychology, part channeling, part shamanism, and part living in the 5th century, so it tends to get a wee bit romanticized with the knights in the round table. Which is all find for a bard and I am not complaining. All I know is it works for me and makes me happy. I know that being a druid is a lot more fun that going to a church on Sunday. I would rather take a walk in the park with my time. And I love Celtic music. However, I am not out to change the world with druidry, I am just out to live a better and more spiritual life. In many ways, being a druid offers me an escape from the real world and an excuse to get out into nature. Plus I love being around magical people. I see druids as the new hippies, the ones who love tofu and beans and weed and want to live in caber houses in the new forest ecotopia. We are kind of like business men who go to Grateful Dead concerts, and then back to our coffee world jobs on Monday, but feeling a little less stressed. Plus, as a writer, the druid world is grand, and I write modern myth and not fantasy. You are really lucky to live where you do, and I hope you always really appreciate all the magical places and forests around you. Best Star Tree

    #10454
    Dowrgi
    Participant

    But here is a new theory, all of the new religions like Christianity are nothing but the old religions that have new characters and gods standing in for the old gods. Such as Mother Mary for the earth Goddess, or Jesus for Angus OG, or god for Dagda, or the saints like Bridget for the goddess Bridget. What do you think about that?

    Well, Pliny wrote nomina alia aliis gentibus – basically the concept of same gods, different names, so I think the idea has been around for a while.

    Plus, as a writer, the druid world is grand, and I write modern myth and not fantasy.

    What would you say is the purpose of myth?

    #10456
    david poole
    Participant

    I think myth is a way to preserve and transmit some of our really old stories, or to tell bits of our history, or to keep people entertained at a time when storytelling was the main entertainment that people had. So it didn’t necessarily have to be truthful, although it could be. With all of the translations and all of the writers that myth has been through, it is even less likely to be completely true.

    #10460
    Anonymous

    Hail Druid Dowrgi, and Druid Poole, the Kabbalah is nothing more than Jewish mysticism so there would have be Jewish mysticism at the time of Christ and that is how I think he got his Jaysus Super Powers. But there is a major difference here between Druid thought and Christian thought, and that is Christians think there is a god who lives across a big abyss, and in druid spirituality god is not off in the distance and unreachable because the otherworld is interwoven with ours and fully accessible which is huge difference. Myth, according to Scholem, is ” Myth, I would say, enables man to experience imaginatively what logic might deny, that there is an essential link between the ultimate nature of reality and his own passions, his sexuality, his very biology and anatomy. It draws its power from the strange and satisfying paradox that there is a beautiful and compelling isomorphism between all that is marked by mutability, transience, and decay in human life and the stuff of eternity. It thus enables ephemeral man to feel a visceral sustaining connection with the encompassing order of things.”

    Scholem, Gershom. Major Trends in Jewish Mysticism . Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group. Kindle Edition.

    #10491
    Dowrgi
    Participant

    The trouble with definitions of god is that they tend to get mired in semantic debate: omnipresence versus pantheism, transcendent but immanent and so on and so forth, not to mention the impossible debates surrounding good and evil. I doubt that any two practitioners of any faith have exactly the same idea of god in their heads, at least if they’re being honest and not just repeating what they may have been told by someone else. The non-canonical Gospel of Thomas, found in the 1940s, buried in the sands of Egypt for centuries, sheds some interesting light on what some early Christians may have believed and it is quite surprising for sure.

    Anyway, getting back to the point. What purpose does myth serve?

    I think that there are myths and there are myths, so to speak. There are myths that may have once served as mnemonics for practical purposes, but their metaphors are so ancient and there original contexts so divorced in time from our own that we have lost the ability to understand them without doing some serious digging and even that leads us inevitably to speculation or conjecture. I’ve read some interesting materials in recent years about how constellation names and star-lore, something which might interest you, may go back to the Stone Age and be connected to seasonal hunting patterns; some cave paintings in France, I believe, have been convincingly interpreted as mapping out the stars. The other group of myths, in my opinion, are also full of lost metaphors, but are more metaphysical and connected to teachings and truths to be revealed – they should never be read as prose. The Fourth Branch of The Mabinogi is an interesting case in point, from what I’ve read and reflected upon myself, it’s about many things far beyond turning into eagles and owls. Interestingly enough, the actual origin and etymology of the Greek word mythos is unknown, itself shrouded in mystery, something which I find quite poignant too.

    Bennathow.
    /|\

Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.