How many druids were there?

The British Druid Order Forums BDO Public Forum How many druids were there?

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  • #11580
    david poole
    Participant

    I think that that is an excellent idea WTStC. You are starting to show an open mind. Hutton is very academic in his perspective and focuses mainly on history, and mainly on certain periods the eighteenth to early twentieth century are much stronger than later periods; the modern era is dealt with quite well but in much less depth and length. John and Caitlin Matthews are well worth reading, they are very good writers and have made an effort in their research. Again though they can be more historical, but some of this material informs modern Druidry. Philip Carr Gomm it must be said has written quite a lot of books on this subject. Emma Restall Orr, John Michael Greer and Penny Billington are also worth reading.

    #11593
    Dave TheDruid-3X3
    Participant

    Dowrgi wrote: “I don’t think Julius Caesar massacred the druids to be honest, in fact there were tribes allied with Rome and they, presumably, would have had their druids who remained unscathed.”

    Are you not getting the UK Druids confused with the Gaulic Druids which I do understand to have had Tribes that were Allied with Rome until they Revolted under Vercingetorix. After winning the Siege of Allisium in about 52 AD, Julius Caesar then Massacred the rest of the Gaulic Tribes in a similar way as they did with the UK Druidism.

    3X3

    #11595
    Dowrgi
    Participant

    Are you not getting the UK Druids confused with the Gaulic Druids which I do understand to have had Tribes that were Allied with Rome until they Revolted under Vercingetorix. After winning the Siege of Allisium in about 52 AD, Julius Caesar then Massacred the rest of the Gaulic Tribes in a similar way as they did with the UK Druidism.

    No, not at all. In terms of Britain, Julius Caesar did not actually see or conquer very much and then there was nearly a century of non-Roman presence, basically a token client king relationship with a couple of southeastern tribes until Claudius arrived nearly a hundred years later. However, if Augustus, Tiberius and then Claudius were all issuing punitive measures and laws against druids, we might fairly presume that Julius Caesar hadn’t wiped them out. Not all of the British tribes had a hostile relationship with Rome at all, but then heroic epics and glorious histories are not usually written about quiet tribes who didn’t get involved in conflicts, certainly not by ancient writers anyway.

    Bennathow
    /|\

    #11623
    Startree
    Participant

    I feel that if druids are thought of as the priest and seers of the Celtic tribes, then there would be anywhere from one to twenty druids per tribe. It would depend on the tribe and the relationship with the druids to the chieftain of the tribe and how successful the tribe was at taking over land and fighting other tribes. I also think that the end of the old druids came at the end of the tribal system when Christianity replace the old priest and seers, so we know this must have started happening sometime around 300 ad at the earliest, when Constantine degreed Rome to be a christian. Wales seemed to pick up on christianity early on, and with this roman invasion it also brought writing, so we have records of the early Celtic poems and myth. By 400 we have the dark ages, and the early approach of the Anglo Saxons. But old ways don’t die out that quick, so I think there were druids around in 700 ad and all the way to 12000 in some remote parts of Ireland and Scotland. I still wonder about the druid schools. I don’t know if I buy that one. And I think the world druid is misleading, but useful. I do think there were also magic men who lived in the woods, who were very close to nature. However, my whole thesis on druids is that they learned magic from the faerie races, which are still around, so there is no reason to think that there are not still authentic old school druids who learn their craft from the faeries. Real druids are connected up with the Celtic otherworld in my way of looking at it. Best William

    #11624
    Startree
    Participant

    if druids are thought of as the priest and seers of the Celtic tribes, then there would be anywhere from one to twenty druids per tribe. It would depend on the tribe and the relationship with the druids to the chieftain of the tribe and how successful the tribe was at taking over land and fighting other tribes. I also think that the end of the old druids came at the end of the tribal system when Christianity replace the old priest and seers, so we know this must have started happening sometime around 300 ad at the earliest, when Constantine degreed Rome to be a christian. Wales seemed to pick up on christianity early on, and with this roman invasion it also brought writing, so we have records of the early Celtic poems and myth. By 400 we have the dark ages, and the early approach of the Anglo Saxons. But old ways don’t die out that quick, so I think there were druids around in 700 ad and all the way to 12000 in some remote parts of Ireland and Scotland. I still wonder about the druid schools. I don’t know if I buy that one. And I think the world druid is misleading, but useful. I do think there were also magic men who lived in the woods, who were very close to nature. However, my whole thesis on druids is that they learned magic from the faerie races, which are still around, so there is no reason to think that there are not still authentic old school druids who learn their craft from the faeries. Real druids are connected up with the Celtic otherworld in my way of looking at it. Best William

    #11626
    Startree
    Participant

    There are still authentic druids on earth today.

    • This reply was modified 1 week, 4 days ago by Startree.
    #11630
    david poole
    Participant

    If we are true to what we believe in then yes.

    #11637
    Dowrgi
    Participant

    Constantine degreed Rome to be a christian.

    Contrary to much popular belief, the Emperor Constantine wasn’t a Christian until his final days, he was a catechumen, a kind of adult, learner-Christian, and he wasn’t baptised until he was on his death bed. The Edict of Milan in 313 CE was actually an edict of religious tolerance, it didn’t suddenly convert the Roman Empire and Constantine himself maintained a relationship with late Roman paganism too. Throughout the whole 4th century, paganism continued in the Empire with various degrees of tolerance and outbreaks on intolerance and it wasn’t until the mid-5th century, with Rome already on the wane and Britain abandoned, that the harshest persecution of paganism began on a state level. This means that, especially in the more remote and outlying parts of the Empire, there was plenty of space and time for non-/pre-Christian beliefs to continue.

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