Hello

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 21 total)
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  • #12098
    Raven.
    Participant

    Hi all.
    Just joined this site and wanted to introduce myself. I’ve had a long-term fascination with Nature-based spiritualities and would regard myself as being pantheistic in my outlook. I live in a wild part of Scotland, surrounded by incredible landscapes and species, so the opportunity to experience the sacred in Nature is always there.

    #12100
    david poole
    Participant

    Welcome Raven. Scotland is certainly an amazing place. I look forward to hearing more.

    #12105
    ravenblackthorn
    Participant

    Welcome Raven!

    I love Scotland – it’s been my home for 20 years! 🙂

    #12106
    Dowrgi
    Participant

    Hello Raven, welcome, dynnargh dhis and fàilte!

    I look forward to hearing more from you and hope you enjoy being here with us.

    Bennathow
    /|\

    #12110
    Raven.
    Participant

    Thanks for the welcome, folks. Looking forward to taking part.

    #12115
    Startree
    Participant

    Hi Raven, have you been to the sun honey stone circle near Castle drum? Are there any local
    Celtic Gods or Goddesses where you live? Are there a lot of the good folks, the fey, in Scotland?
    Best William

    #12124
    Raven.
    Participant

    Hi Startree
    Good questions. No, I haven’t been to the Sunhoney stone circle. I’ll have to check it out next time I’m in Aberdeen (I’m from the north-east originally. Lots of Pictish stones and circles there). Any local gods or goddesses? I’m probably the wrong person to ask! I don’t believe in gods or goddesses, but I can see the value in believing in them if it provides a focus for ritual or devotion. I’m a pantheistic atheist (if that makes sense) in that I don’t believe in deities, but I try and live my life in a way that acknowledges that Nature is sacred, and which respects the natural processes that have created our Universe. To put it in religious terms, Nature is my ‘church’.
    I’m not a Druid, but I do understand and respect a lot of what Druidry teaches. Perhaps I’m not that different to you all in terms of how we view Nature.

    #12128
    Dowrgi
    Participant

    Morning Raven.

    In view of your reply to Startree, this is why I for one prefer to view and refer to Druidism/Druidry as a path, thereby avoiding words such as religion, priest, priestess and so on because of all the cultural and historical baggage they bring, not to mention the potential for misunderstanding too. Naturally, this is only my view, but the nice thing about Druidism is that there is space for many views – there are Christian, monotheist, polytheist, pantheist, panentheist, transtheist druids along with many others.

    Do you feel that there are, however, things that we cannot see or entities/beings which may inhabit the worlds beyond our mortal, human veil of perception?

    Bennathow
    /|\

    #12134
    Dave TheDruid-3X3
    Participant

    Awens to Raven!

    I do Rider Waite Tarot, Runes Castings and I-Ching Chinese Divinations. If you want an Internet Reading, just PM me and I will send you a Reading.

    I am also into Herbological Healing so if you have an Pain or Ailment, Please feel free to ask me or Download my Online Treasury of Sacred Herbs & Herbology.

    3X3

    #12142
    Startree
    Participant

    Dowrgi, I like your view of druidry, and I think it is a path too. I like the fact that there are not rules in druidry, gift from the hippies. the less religion in druidry the better. I like exploring different concepts. I like nature. and as the Grateful Dead sing, answeres are plenty in the bye and bye. it is probably more important to just live life and have friends to do stuff with than to worry too much about the afterlife, and religion. And from history, it seems most of the Celtic Gods were partying a lot.
    and it is important to be kind, well, at least as kind as is possible. just seven more days to harvest home. However, every once in a while, strange things from other dimensions do happen in life, or at least they seem to happen to me.

    #12145
    Startree
    Participant

    Raven. Do they play shinty where you are? Love Shinty.

    #12147
    david poole
    Participant

    I have to ask, what is Shinty? How does it work? I have not heard of this game before.

    #12149
    Dowrgi
    Participant

    Hi Dave,

    In the boyhood deeds of Cú Chulainn, he plays hurling (iománaíocht), well, shinty (camanachd) is basically the Scots version of the game – the main difference is that the Irish game has a flattened hurling stick, a bit more like a paddle, whereas the Scottish game has a rounded stick, almost walking stick shape. They’re very ancient games indeed, perhaps among the oldest documented in the world. Wales has a similar sport, bando, and Cornwall may have had, I believe, a form of hurling that was lost – today’s Cornish hurling is more like the old village-country “football”, except it’s played with a small, silver ball – it seems that any version of a game with sticks, if it was indeed played that way, died out long ago.

    Bennathow
    /|\

    #12151
    Startree
    Participant

    Hi David and Dowrgi, I did a lot of research on shinty for my book, and some people think the Harry Potter lady based her weird game on shinty. Anyway, as I understand it, shinty was a way to train people for battle.
    It is rather a violent sport, with people hitting each other with sticks, and there are lots of devious ways to cheat. I think the druids invented shinty, but of course, I make up all kinds of stuff, all the time. But still, they could have. Thanks for all the great information Dowrgi. Also, there is a lot of strategy and tactics in shinty games. There are also girls’ shinty teams, and the girls are quite good at the game. I know Aberdeen U has a shinty team. And shinty is big in Fort William. shinty is fun, and kids love the game. However, I don’t think many people use a lot of protective gear in the game, and that will probably change as time goes on. shinty sticks have even been made of dried seaweed, but now they use very cool shinty sticks. three are even professional shinty players as I understand it. there is some interest in shinty in the USA. But for now, Scotland is the home of shinty. Oh, also did I tell you that the druids invented golf. Yes they did, In fact the druids invented everything wonderful.

    #12154
    Startree
    Participant

    I think the BDO should challenge the OBOD to a game of shinty, because the BDO is number one, we are number one. Everyone should bring homemade shinty sticks. of course the obod would not stand a chance against the BDO.

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