Clocks and Druids …

The British Druid Order Forums BDO Public Forum Clocks and Druids …

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  • #14822
    Dowrgi
    Participant

    The Druidism of Clocks

    I’ve always been fascinated by clockwork gadgets, the intricate mechanisms, the ticking, the movements. Recently, I bought myself a very old, probably 1950s, bedside alarm clock. It needed a good cleaning up and oiling, but now it works just like … clockwork … if you’ll pardon the pun. This got me thinking about all kinds of things. Our forebears built stone circles and erected menhirs that were aligned with solstices, moon risings and the stars and – at least according to some – these were their clocks and calendars. Is there something primordial in our following the passage of time? Our ancestors’ clocks were circular, their houses were circular, and even today our watch and clock faces are more often than not circular. That idea of time being circular, a cycle, as one cycle ends another begins, chimes well with what I presume are many of our beliefs.

    I like the idea of winding the clock up, too: we put ‘our’ energy into the machine and it comes ‘alive’ – our own energy measuring time and bringing the daily ‘rite’ of winding up the machine as if we were sacrificing some of our own life-force, our energy, in return for measuring time and, inevitably, the passing of our existence – at least in this form and reality.

    So, I think there’s a lot to be said for mechanical watches and clocks from a druid’s point of view, moreover, we could also look at the other objects we use in our lives, too, evaluating them from a druid’s perspective.

    Another added bonus, of course, is that clockwork devices are probably more eco-friendly in that they don’t need batteries, with all of their pollutants and heavy metals that can lead to air, water and soil pollution. In today’s world, it is indeed hard to function without using batteries of some sort, unless someone goes entirely off-grid, which isn’t viable for most people; however, a ‘small act of druidism’ may be to invest in clockwork and mechanical devices such as watches and clocks that only a generation or two ago were the norm anyway.

    Bennathow
    /|\

    #14851
    Dave TheDruid-3X3
    Participant

    One thing I have noticed about Neo-Paganistic Druidism is that it is for the paying Reverence & Respect for anything Circular, Periodic or Repetitive list the Seasons, the passing of the Days, Weeks, Months, Years.

    Things Periodic such as how the Blood Flows in Circles around the Body shows this. And there is also how Electricity Transmits Better in an AC Alternating Current. Carts, Wagons and Cars work with Circular Wheels, Gears and Rotating Shafts.

    And as Bennathow has shown, Mechanical Clocks work with Turning Circular Gears, Springs and Wheels.

    In order to show our Reverence for such things, Ancient Druids & Pagans tended to build Circular Temples, Forts and Ceremonies.

    So it is no small wonder that Bennathow has such fond things to say about the Circular Workings of Clocks.

    3X3

    #14858
    Dowrgi
    Participant

    And of course we are still using a base-60 system to measure time, with 60 seconds in a minute and 60 minutes in an hour coming down to us over 5,000 years from Ancient Mesopotamian mathematics.

    Bennathow (blessings)
    /|\

    #14894
    Bob
    Participant

    I saw an old fashioned alarm clock in a film recently. I always liked the ticking sound and the bedtime ritual of winding it up is a comforting reminder of childhood. I must see if I can get one.

    #14896
    Dowrgi
    Participant

    Evening Bob,

    They’re not all that hard to come by, you can pick them up at second-hand stores or online for relatively little. One word of advice, though, take them to an old-fashioned watchmaker for a clean, service and oil. Another thing I’d add with old clocks and watches, especially 1920s-1940s period, many of them used radium in the lume, the glow-in-the-dark hands and numbers, that isn’t necessarily the greatest thing to have around you, especially if it has turned to dust with the passage of time, so, personally, I’d avoid them.

    Bennathow
    /|\

    #14897
    Angela Lawton
    Participant

    An alarm clock reminds me of my late father. He used to have one placed in the lid of an old biscuit tin to increase the sound because he got up at 5 am each day to do a milk round. He hated that job but went anyway. I also remembered the mirrored walls of my parents bedroom where I would go to stand most nights after having disturbed dreams. I used to touch my mother on the head to wake her up. An alarm clock and biscuit tin.

    #14899
    Angela Lawton
    Participant

    Later on when I was 15 I used to sit in that mirrored room and drink a whole bottle of cider whilst I did my make-up to look 18 and get into the local pub for a disco each week. I would spend my pocket money on entrance fee and beer. Two pound fifty went a long way in those days.

    #14902
    Angela Lawton
    Participant

    50p for the bus, 50p to get in the disco and half a lager was 50p in those days, so you would get a few drinks.

    #14938
    Dowrgi
    Participant

    Well Angela, I remember sitting bored during afternoon lessons at school with the clock ticking away so … ever … so … slowly. It seemed to be perpetually stuck at 2.30 pm and that last hour until home time never seemed to want to come … 😀

    Bennathow
    /|\

    #14940
    Angela Lawton
    Participant

    Dowrgi, well I was mostly drunk in English lessons as me and my sister would go home at lunchtime and drink my fahter’s whiskey, and go back to school, I didn’t like school at all.

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