Cell of Song – Poetry Works

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  • #14575
    Mark Scales
    Participant

      A warm welcome to you all.
      Having undertaken the first year of my bardic journey, I have produced a completed works of poetry and photography that I am very proud to have produced.
      If anyone would like a free copy via email (PDF) please let me have your email address and I would be most pleased to share the joy of my poetry with you.
      Warmest wishes to you all
      Mark

      #14748
      Woody
      Participant

        Hi,

        I would like to have a look please. I need to do my “cell of song” and have not got around to it yet.
        Many things seem to get in the way! Very soon I think, that was a lot of reading!

        neil.haywood@gmail.com

        Thanks.

        Regards,
        Roke

        #14964
        Myrddin
        Participant

          Hello Mark,
          Would very much like to experience your poetry!

          russbev@lineone.net

          Blessings!

          #15227
          Salvatore Garfi
          Participant

            Hello All!

            I’m just beginning the Bardic Course, and I’m actually quite uncertain about what the Cell of Song is. I gather that it’s some kind of corpus of work, but what can that work be? I’m not a natural poet, nor an artist (neither graphic or photographic), so what are the avenues open to one?

            #15228
            Dowrgi
            Participant

              Hello Salvatore and welcome …

              If you’ve only just started the course, I wouldn’t worry too much about the Cell of Song yet. Work your way through the materials at your own pace and it will probably become clearer to you. Naturally, the Bardic Course seeks to bring out your talents – especially in terms of music, poetry, and art, but there’s a lot more, too – once you connect to the awen, I’m sure you’ll find inspiration.

              Bennathow
              /|\

              #15231
              Salvatore Garfi
              Participant

                Thanks Dowrgi/Bennathow!

                You are right, perhaps I shouldn’t concern myself with this too much at present, but one of my ‘worry bag’ items was that I don’t feel ‘artsy’ enough. I’m not afraid of writing prose, and people seem to think that my writing style isn’t bad – as an archaeologist (I’m now retired), I’ve written one book and contributed to a few others, and also in this specific incarnation, I did view archaeology (and still do) through an experiential prism. In fact, I could write reams on it! Anyway, thanks again for your comments. Let’s see where the Awen flows!

                #15233
                Dowrgi
                Participant

                  Hello again Salvatore, a late good evening to you!

                  Firstly, as you’ve said, too, I wouldn’t worry too much just yet. Given time, things often fall into place in their own natural way. Although it would be beneficial to experiment with poetry and drawing, I don’t think there’s anything wrong with writing prose either. I don’t know what your archaeological field/exact area of specialisation or expertise is, but you may well be able to bring that into your work, may you not? Perhaps imagining the stories, developing into a mythos, about some of your finds? Just a thought … On your bio, you’ve written that you live in central Wales, surely there’s plenty of archaeological inspiration there for you, is there not? For part of my bardic course work I based a long poem on a menhir in Penwith, Cornwall – the Mên Scryfa. Being based in Wales, you might find the Englynion y Beddau (The Stanzas of the Graves) a useful source of inspiration, too; I have an excellent copy of this, a 2015 edition, in Welsh and English, published by Gwasg Carreg Gwalch, it’s beautifully illustrated and contains lots of useful notes. So, perhaps that could get you started.

                  Anyway, glad to be of some assistance.

                  Bennathow (Cornish for blessings) 😀
                  /|\

                  #15240
                  Salvatore Garfi
                  Participant

                    Hello All,

                    I’ve just tried posting something, but I’m getting a message saying that my post cannot be created. Is that usual?

                    #15244
                    Dowrgi
                    Participant

                      Hi Salvatore,

                      Yeah, sometimes the forum seems to be in a bad mood, it does this sometimes, hence some of my staggered replies elsewhere.

                      Bennathow
                      /|\

                      #15247
                      Salvatore Garfi
                      Participant

                        Hello Dowrgi,

                        I’m cutting up my original post, so this is part 1 of 2 (actually, it’s not really that long!).

                        Hello Dowrgi,

                        Again, thanks for your comments! In truth, it’s not a lack of inspiration on my part, it’s what eventual form that inspiration should take. If we were to take the ancient and/or medieval Bards and ‘translate’ them into the modern era, they would include not just poets, musicians, and artists, but film makers (of all genres), prose authors, journalists and social commentators, and of course historians (including archaeologists), to list just a few from what must be a more extensive list. These are all people who could fulfill the role of the Bard as we (in my view) envisage it. They are all saying something about society, and they can inspire, satire, praise, tell stories, and keep alive traditions (while inventing new ones), and inform us about our varied histories. On this latter note, for instance, someone like Ronald Hutton is a Bard, even though he writes straight forward histories. He tells us something about our roots, and like any good historian (or archaeologist), he brings history into the present, and that very act (even in a dry commentary) is one of memorialisation. In archaeological terms, this is a view that most people don’t have when they think of archaeology. It’s usually something akin to something reflective of Time Team, and one is always asked ‘what ‘ave you found?’ It’s always about ‘things, things and more things’.

                        I’ve had many incarnations in my archaeological career, and I’ve worked in extremely varied environments, but in all of these, the fieldworker (even if not acknowledged to oneself) has an undeniably sensual relationship with that which is being studied or explored. The ghosts of the past, through their material remains are brought forward into the present and subsequently into our minds – they become part of our memory, and this, the archaeologist (as Bard?) preserves. In fact, there’s one archaeologist who has written about the archaeologist as shaman. He might be stretching the point, but I think there’s some validity there (especially if you do a lot of landscape work as I have).

                        #15248
                        Salvatore Garfi
                        Participant

                          Part 2 of 3?

                          When I’ve done long term landscape work in what could be called ‘wilder’ environments, you lose yourself in it, you acquire a ‘dwelling perspective’. Like Captain Vimes in Disc World, you learn to know where you are through the soles of your feet. You sense subtle differences in the landscape intuitively, and your ability to predict through what is really a sensual interaction with the landscape becomes heightened. You and the landscape start to merge, and through that you understand it and its story. In a way, you lose yourself and then you come out with new knowledge – you therefore change!

                          #15249
                          Salvatore Garfi
                          Participant

                            Part 3 of 3?

                            By the way, there is a lot of inspiration in my immediate Welsh environment, eg, just opposite my house is an escarpment called Maen Arthur (Arthur’s Stone), and it’s the name of a wood which predates its present management by Natural Resources Wales. There’s also an Iron age hill fort at the edge of the wood, and although it’s not named after Arthur, it does have a large rocky outcrop in the middle of it, so I think it’s that which is the stone referred to in the place name. Just a thought.

                            Again, thanks for your comments,
                            Sal

                            #15250
                            Salvatore Garfi
                            Participant

                              What a bore..! It’s taken three subdivisions just to post a simple message. Grrrhhh….!

                              #16352
                              Wolfsong
                              Participant

                                Hi Mark
                                Yes please, I would like to see your work, I am just in the middle of doing my Cell of Song exercise. Definitely an interesting subject .

                                Best wishes
                                Wolfsong
                                /|\
                                p.andrews0@talk21.com

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