Awen & Me

Viewing 8 posts - 16 through 23 (of 23 total)
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  • #14283
    Dowrgi
    Participant

    An hen yeth a vyn bewa! Yndella re bo!

    Akordys ov vy …

    Kres ha bennathow war agas hyns, ynwedh.

    /|\

    #14284
    True Owl
    Participant

    Hi,

    Re: “The word nwyfre still exists in Welsh, modern Welsh, and it still means ‘sky’…” _Dowrgi

    – Just for a little exercise, I looked up ‘nwyfre’ on the web in a variety of Welsh to English translator websites, and unfortunately I could not find its meaning as ‘sky’; and one Welsh University translator (Trinity St David, University of Wales) didn’t recognise the word ‘nwyfre’ at all !

    But I did find the following meanings from a variety of 10 other Welsh to English online translators :

    godly (x7)
    Unhood ? (x2)
    nature, free (x1)

    So, maybe the word ‘nwyfre’ has changed its meaning somewhat (from the Middle Welsh to Modern Welsh) – you could say that ‘Life force’ certainly acquaints with ‘godly’ & ‘nature’.

    Blessings,

    Jules.

    #14288
    Dowrgi
    Participant

    Gorthugher da – Noswaith dda,

    I always use this one: https://welsh-dictionary.ac.uk/gpc/gpc.htmlGPC Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru. Select Diffiniadeu Saesneg at the top for English definitions. There’s an entry for nwyfre, too. This dictionary is great because it lists earliest historical occurences as well as derivations, along with comparisons to other languages – including Cornish, Breton, and Irish.

    Bennathow
    /|\

    #14292
    True Owl
    Participant

    Hi Dowrgi,

    Cool – thanks for the link – I knew you wouldn’t let me down.
    Glad that someone has it listed.

    Thanks,

    Jules.

    #14293
    True Owl
    Participant

    Hi Dowrgi,

    Re: 14283 : “An hen yeth a vyn bewa! Yndella re bo!
    Akordys ov vy …
    Kres ha bennathow war agas hyns, ynwedh”. _Dowrgi.

    I don’t know Cornish at all, but I found a reasonable Cornish translator online.

    I think what you wrote above is this, or similar in meaning …

    “The old language lives on ! So be it !

    I agree …

    Peace & blessings likewise on your path.”

    Is that about right ?

    (You will have me speaking Cornish yet ! LOL).

    Thanks,

    Jules.

    #14297
    Dowrgi
    Participant

    Myttin da True Owl,

    Yes, that’s pretty accurate.

    Bennathow
    /|\

    #14385
    Greywolf
    Keymaster

    Hi True Owl and Dowgri, and thank you for a really interesting thread. Translating any word from one language into another is always fraught with difficulty, especially when that word is in a medieval version of a language, even moreso if, like me, you do not speak even the modern language. When I do bite the bullet and attempt a translation from Welsh, the GPC online dictionary is always my go-to resource. It not only contains words from the language throughout its history, it even lists the original sources where the words are found. It also gives the range of possible meanings. This is especially useful since words that are spelt the same often have several very different meanings that can only be judged from context.
    Back to the primary topic, there have been many times throughout the 16 years I’ve been working on these courses when I have absolutely felt guided by the awen. One that crops up in the revised bardic course is my interpretation of ‘The Battle of the Trees’ as a healing spell similar to the Anglo-Saxon ‘Nine Herbs Charm.’ I had decided to perform ‘The Battle of the Trees’ as part of a ceremony we held in our Iron Age roundhouse a few years ago during a camp the theme of which was herbal healing. The decision was based solely on the fact that the poem mentions a number of herbs. However, while reading it again in preparation for performing it, I was overwhelmed with the understanding of it as a healing charm. Each time I read it again, I saw greater evidence of this. I performed it in the ceremony, which was pretty amazing. Then, when I began revising the relevant booklet, using Derwydd’s brilliant new translation of the poem, I did some serious research on it which made me even more sure I was right. Having sent the revised booklet to Ronald Hutton, he agreed that my interpretation was probably right and confirmed that no one had ever come up with it before. Throughout all of this, I could feel a kind of tingling sensation like static electricity, something I’ve encountered previously when the awen has been flowing particularly strongly. It’s an amazing feeling and its repeated occurrence throughout the last 16 years has been a powerful factor in keeping me working, and enjoying the work!
    All good blessings,
    Greywolf /|\

    #14386
    True Owl
    Participant

    Hi Greywolf,
    Hope you are keeping well.
    I loved your telling of your experiences when performing ‘the Battle of Trees’ in a ceremony at the Iron Age Roundhouse a few years ago. What made me blink, was your mention of a tingling effect you experienced – This, I have also experienced myself !
    I remember doing a healing on a friend of mine, who for many years had a wart on his finger. I rubbed the wart with a leaf and said some words over it, calling on the healing spirits of nature. After a week, the wart had disappeared, but unfortunately, my friend was not very grateful, as he put it down to coincidence! No matter – What I am pointing to though, was that whilst this healing was going on, I felt a flow of tingling electric static through my body at the time, just like you mentioned. I also put it down to the strong flow of awen, and have experienced this feeling many times, particularly when being creative, ie. when writing songs on guitar.
    May the awen continue to bless you abundantly.
    Jules.
    (True Owl).

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