Reply To: Here comes the sun, Lugh, Lughnasad, Danu

The British Druid Order Forums BDO Public Forum Here comes the sun, Lugh, Lughnasad, Danu Reply To: Here comes the sun, Lugh, Lughnasad, Danu

#11304
Anonymous

Awesome, I will do some research on ogyrven,

“The name Kore or Cer for a grain/earth goddess is echoed in many parts of the world. She is Ker, Kern, Kur, Kar, Kan, Kali, Kami-Musumi, Kanya, Kaya-Nu-Hime, Kedesh, Kenemet, Keres, Khamadhenu, Core, Kele, Ceres, Ca, Cabiro, Cailleach, Cel, Cer,

Mason, Paul; Franklin, Anna . Lughnasa (The Eight Festivals Book 2) (Kindle Locations 818-819). Lear Books. Kindle Edition.

Ceridwen, Car, Carman, Cor and Cybele. She gives us our word ‘corn’ and her name is remembered in the Northern English/Scottish Border custom of making a ‘kern-baby’ or ‘kernababy’, a corn dolly bound from the last sheaf of the harvest. We find her name in the kernel (kern-el) of the grain.

Mason, Paul; Franklin, Anna . Lughnasa (The Eight Festivals Book 2) (Kindle Locations 819-821). Lear Books. Kindle Edition.

Ceridwen – In Brythonic Celtic lore, Ceridwen is the goddess of the harvest.

Mason, Paul; Franklin, Anna . Lughnasa (The Eight Festivals Book 2) (Kindle Location 5500). Lear Books. Kindle Edition.

Ceridwen was an enchantress, mother of Morfran and a beautiful daughter Creirwy. Her husband was Tegid Foel, and they lived near Bala Lake (Llyn Tegid) in north Wales. The earliest recorded form of her name, found in the Black Book of Carmarthen, is Cyrridven which appears to mean ‘crooked woman’ (cyrrid = ‘crooked /bent’ and ben = ‘woman’), which is interesting and may associate her with the underworld. The more common form Ceridwen means ‘beloved/blessed/sacred’.”

Mason, Paul; Franklin, Anna . Lughnasa (The Eight Festivals Book 2) (Kindle Locations 6145-6149). Lear Books. Kindle Edition.